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farmlife

1413 Posts


Posted - Aug 21 2015 :  7:11:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Elli tried to mount me just shortly before she delivered, Charlene. Remember that hormones can make them do things they wouldn't normally, and they teach you as you go. I don't bend over in front of Elli now. (I don't even remember what I was bent over to look at.) I concur with MaryJane and Janet. Get right back on the horse so to speak, but be aware. Not tentative or scared, but very aware.

When we first started milking Elli she would pull backward on the stanchion when she wanted out. We made a point to never let her out when she was doing that even if we were done. We'd wait until she didn't have any tension on the stanchion before releasing her. Now she knows she won't get her way if she does that and it didn't take long to teach her at all. I would side step Clover and wait until she is calm before giving her any food. She shouldn't associate food with bad behavior. I also would change my tone of voice depending what she is doing like MaryJane said. She should know when you are happy with her and when you aren't.

It will get better. Good luck!
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CloversMum

3473 Posts


Posted - Aug 22 2015 :  8:50:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you, Keeley, for your advice and encouragement!

The hobbles came today and my son and I will work together with Clover, working on positive reinforcement while keeping everyone safe.


Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; 1 Jersey cow; 1 Guernsey cow; 1 Guernsey steer calf; Oberhasli & Guernsey goats, ducks and chickens
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farmlife

1413 Posts


Posted - Aug 24 2015 :  8:11:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good idea, Charlene. A team is always better at the beginning. :)
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CloversMum

3473 Posts


Posted - Aug 26 2015 :  08:09:01 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
So, another question for you all more experienced ... Clover's udder is growing daily it appears but it is not swollen or shiny. Will that happen before birth? I know that my goats' udders will get almost shiny looking and extremely swollen right before labor starts and I didn't know if that were similar to cows. I'll try to grab a photo of Clover this morning.

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; 1 Jersey cow; 1 Guernsey cow; 1 Guernsey steer calf; Oberhasli & Guernsey goats, ducks and chickens
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NellieBelle

10929 Posts


Posted - Aug 26 2015 :  09:09:16 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I posted a photo of Nellie in early labor. She was antsy and moving around but not ready to deliver. This was late afternoon and she delivered that night at 11:30 p.m. I don't remember a shiny udder but definitely very large swollen tight udder. I think it would be different for every cow.

To laugh is human but to moo is bovine. Author Unknown
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txbikergirl

3191 Posts


Posted - Aug 26 2015 :  5:50:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
i don't have any info, just sending blessings your way and ready to share in the excitement.

if all goes well with miss sally o'mally (we find out next week) then we may be experiencing this early May 2016 ;>

Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
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CloversMum

3473 Posts


Posted - Aug 26 2015 :  7:00:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote




Clover's udder looks similar to Nellie's; however, Clover is not yet acting antsy. Today she was lying down but her back leg couldn't touch the ground because of the size of her udder. Poor girl. Obviously, we are getting closer to the big day but who knows exactly when!

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; 1 Jersey cow; 1 Guernsey cow; 1 Guernsey steer calf; Oberhasli & Guernsey goats, ducks and chickens
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NellieBelle

10929 Posts


Posted - Aug 26 2015 :  7:12:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I remember hearing Nellie first. She was in the barn and lying down, and now and then she would move a little and moan. I could see the calf moving. Even when she stood she would moan a little and push her head into something, sometimes into Sienna. Then she started walking around, almost pacing. So I could tell she was in labor. As much as you've watched Clover I think you will pick up on her changes. Nellie was always interested in food so that didn't change at all. Yes, her udder is quite large. Won't be many more days to wait.

To laugh is human but to moo is bovine. Author Unknown
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maryjane

6764 Posts


Posted - Aug 27 2015 :  12:09:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow, Charlene, her udder is looking fabulous!!! Just watch for a swollen vulva like in Janet's photo. Once those folds start to disappear, she's close.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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CloversMum

3473 Posts


Posted - Aug 27 2015 :  08:27:08 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have to laugh ... I think a large part of farm life is watching the hind end of all my farm critters! This spring I was watching several goat hind ends, I have to check my chickens' vents to see which ones are producing and which are not, I watch my chicks for pasty butts (rarely a problem, but I do watch that first week), and now I'm staring at Clover's hind end. lol

All those idyllic pastoral painted farm scenes are not completely accurate! :-)

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; 1 Jersey cow; 1 Guernsey cow; 1 Guernsey steer calf; Oberhasli & Guernsey goats, ducks and chickens
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farmlife

1413 Posts


Posted - Aug 27 2015 :  4:32:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Be flexible, too, Charlene. Elli did all of this for weeks. It was really hard to be patient and alert for all that time. You'll do so much better than I did, though, because of your experience with your goats. When it was actually labor I felt like the boy who cried wolf. I didn't recognize it for what it was because she was so calm, went in the house and came back to a calf less than an hour later. Be aware, but don't make yourself crazy. :)
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CloversMum

3473 Posts


Posted - Aug 28 2015 :  08:28:13 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
How I understand the need for patience and alertness all at the same time! I have to do that with my goats every spring. Only it is much easier, as my goats always deliver within 2 days before or after their due date. Their gestation doesn't allow much leeway which is great for me being "on watch". Cows just have a bigger window which makes for a much longer time being on watch.

I see all of Clover's signs, but, honestly, I think I'm still in disbelief that she is actually going to have a calf. I've waited so long for this! And, can't believe its actually happening!! I would really prefer that she waits to calve until the air quality is better ... but I don't think she can wait months! lol

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; 1 Jersey cow; 1 Guernsey cow; 1 Guernsey steer calf; Oberhasli & Guernsey goats, ducks and chickens
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txbikergirl

3191 Posts


Posted - Apr 27 2016 :  7:13:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
ok ladies, we are a little over 10 days out and i think we are prepared. the one thing i am not sure of, how long do we keep 10 month old elsa separate from sally and the new baby? just this last week while on vacation we put sally and elsa back in the same paddock and they are both happy as clams (being on vacation we have the luxury of checking on them all day long, and making sure elsa isn't attempting to dry nurse).

i know when elsa goes into heat i need to keep her from the baby for 2-3 days, but other than that how long in the very beginning? or just let sally be the guide of that?

Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
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maryjane

6764 Posts


Posted - Apr 28 2016 :  06:08:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Cindy, in this thread you can see I let my calves mingle as soon as possible (as long as everyone in heat is locked up).

https://www.heritagejersey.org/chatroom/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=1018&whichpage=1

But I don't leave them with others full-time, just outings to the playground so that everyone can get acquainted, butts sniffed, etc. You'll know when you can let the three of them mingle full-time during the day. Sally will let you know. You'll know. But I would keep Sally and baby separate at night for a couple of months or so. Elsa and baby are going to have a blast together. Names yet?

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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maryjane

6764 Posts


Posted - Apr 28 2016 :  06:14:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
And this link should be of interest also:
https://www.heritagejersey.org/chatroom/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=1001

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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txbikergirl

3191 Posts


Posted - May 02 2016 :  06:30:36 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
thanks mary jane, i'll read up on those tonight. i do have some names we are pondering, lover boy patiently listens but just does that hubby thing of nodding and telling me it all sounds good ;> not much help there.

i love the o'mally name so sticking with that and an irish theme.. at least thats what i think. although finding out recently that my great grandmother had a favorite cow called nanette has moved me in that direction, nanette o'mally.

and then i was looking at sally's parentage and she had a great grandcow called "sulley". so i like sulley o'mally, other than it will confuse the heck out of the farm animals as sulley and sally are much too close. we already have issues calling elsa the cow or ellie the pug - they both turn and try to figure out what i want at the same time ;>

Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
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CloversMum

3473 Posts


Posted - May 02 2016 :  10:28:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
not that it matters much ... but I really think the name Nanette is pretty special. :) But you'll find the name that just speaks to you and you'll know it is the right one!

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; 1 Jersey cow; 1 Guernsey cow; 1 Guernsey steer calf; Oberhasli & Guernsey goats, ducks and chickens
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txbikergirl

3191 Posts


Posted - May 03 2016 :  5:24:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
and here is sally post-vet trip today. in all her pregnant-i-am-due-in-6-days-glory. she truly is bigger than this, she assumed her most svelte pose

in all my motherly sense, my thought was to bring this girl home and let her stay close to the barn enjoying the grass closest while being able to go in/out her normal barn corral - home sweet home. this gal wanted none of that.

insisted on going down stippy-stappy lane and then into her regular pasture. and then turned around and looked at me and pretty much said with a stare, "i have put up with enough today. get that little one in here right now". and turned around and walked away. so i dutifully opened elsa's pasture gate and led her out one gate and in another so that she was in momma's pasture. here's sally's baby bump.



and now we await the calf to be. i have pretty much decided on nanette o'mally for a heifer, have about four choices for a bull calf and will let whim lead me on that one if it ocurrs.

Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")

Edited by - txbikergirl on May 03 2016 5:25:46 PM
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maryjane

6764 Posts


Posted - May 04 2016 :  05:32:07 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Gosh, I wake up every morning and count the days again.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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txbikergirl

3191 Posts


Posted - May 04 2016 :  05:36:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
keep your email open and popping, you'll be the first off the farm to know when something happens ;>

Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
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maryjane

6764 Posts


Posted - May 04 2016 :  05:42:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Even reading that quickened my pulse. I have to say, you and Patrick did such an awesome job with her injured hoof. And now your vet team knows her and you that much better.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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