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maryjane

6942 Posts


Posted - Oct 27 2014 :  5:20:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Transporting Dairy Cattle

Animal disease traceability, or knowing where diseased and at-risk animals are, where they've been, and when, is very important (think Ebola). Some bovine diseases result in having to slaughter your cattle, so keeping up-to-date on all required tests is a necessary part of raising and keeping dairy cattle. Plan on at least a week for all testing results to be completed, as some test require waiting periods for results.

Three of the most serious bovine diseases are Bovine Tuberculosis, Brucellosis, and Trichomoniasis.

• Bovine Tuberculosis is a dangerous, chronic, bacterial respiratory-tract disease that can be passed from cows to humans (typically by the ingestion of unpasteurized milk or close contact with their aerosol secretions) and from humans and other animals to cows. Cattle found to be infected with TB are culled. Testing requires a period of three days; my veterinarian came to my farm and gave my cows a “prick test” under their tails with a live antigen, then came back three days later to check the test sites. One of my cows had a reaction; authorities move quickly when that first test is reactive—at 7 a.m. the next morning, the state veterinarian showed up to do a more rigorous test. Thankfully, my cow had produced a false-positive first test; further testing showed she was free from the disease.

• Brucellosis is a highly contagious disease that affects both cattle and humans through ingestion of unpasteurized milk or undercooked meat from infected animals or close contact with their secretions. The disease is also known as contagious abortion or Bang's disease, and causes abortions and lowered milk production. In humans, it's known as undulant fever with severe intermittent fever and long-lasting, flu-like symptoms. There is no effective way to detect infected animals by their appearance, and there is no vaccine for bulls, but female calves are vaccinated when they are between 4 months and 1 year old. Vaccination is not 100% effective in preventing brucellosis; it typically protects about 70-80% of the vaccinated cattle from becoming infected by an average exposure. The vaccine is a live product and must be administered only by an accredited veterinarian or State or Federal Animal Health Official. Brucellosis-infected animals are often culled.

• Trichomoniasis (trich) is a parasitic protozoan that resides in the tissues lining the penis, prepuce, and sheath of bulls, and when spread to a cow through intercourse, causes cows to abort. There is no treatment, so infected bulls must be slaughtered. Fewer than 1% of cows remain carriers (most cows will clear the infection on their own), so they’re usually retested before being culled. As the disease spreads, more and more states are passing laws requiring producers to test their bulls. My state (Idaho) was the first to implement a mandatory trich testing and identification program.

Because of these diseases and their ramifications, when moving cattle from state to state (interstate), you must follow specific rules set up by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

All female dairy cattle of any age and all dairy males born after March 11, 2013 must be officially identified and accompanied by an Interstate Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI), often referred to as a health certificate—an official document issued by a Federal, State or Tribal Animal Health Official or an accredited veterinarian. (On my CVI, my vet also hand-wrote “Not M branded (Mexico origin) and not commingled with M branded cattle.”)

• Official identification, supplied only by a Federal, State or Tribal Animal Health Official or an accredited veterinarian, must be recorded on or attached to the CVI. (The number issued to animals will stay with them for their lifetime, even if a tag falls out.)

• An orange metal ear tag (vet supplied/issued by the USDA) has a paper trail associated with it. The tag is put in a female’s right ear when given a Bang’s vaccination for Brucellosis. Also at that time, her right ear is tattooed in case the orange metal tag ever falls out. (In a female, this tag can then be used as an ID tag for her other required tests/tracking.

• A silver metal tag is simply an identification tag (vet supplied/issued by the USDA) used for tests like Bang’s (bulls) and TB (cows, if they’ve lost their orange tag). Even though metal tags can come out (the reason chips are becoming more popular), it is considered a permanent tag given to a particular animal and also has a paper trail associated with it.

• 840 RFID (Radio Frequency Identification or Electronic) ear tags.

• Registered breed association tattoos or tags, and brands registered with the state brand board may be used if accepted by both the state of origin and the state of destination.

Find out more at USDA Animal Disease Traceabililty.

There may be additional requirements by your state pertaining to moving animals into your state. Contact your state’s Animal Health Official for import requirements for your state. Find state-by-state contact information for all state Animal Health Officials here. Idaho’s number is (208) 332-8540.

For example, Idaho’s law includes the following rules for all cattle coming into the state:

• All intact dairy cattle 6 months of age and older require a negative TB test within 60 days. Females over 4 months of age must be Brucellosis vaccinated. All bulls require an entry permit and either negative Trichomoniasis test within the last 30 days or, if under 12 months, a virgin bull statement. (A certification of virgin status signed by the owner or an authorized veterinarian, saying the bull has never been commingled with breeding females.)

• Due to Vesicular Stomatitis (VS)—a virus infection that resembles foot-and-mouth disease and can be transmitted to humans—all livestock (including cattle, swine, equines, domestic cervidae, and camelids) entering Idaho from Texas and Colorado must meet additional requirements. The animals cannot enter Idaho if they originate from a facility within 10 miles of a diagnosed case of VS. All livestock from Texas and Colorado require an entry permit listed on the CVI, as well as the following statement: “All animals identified on this certificate of veterinary inspection have been examined and found to be free from Vesicular Stomatitis. During the last thirty (30) days; these animals have neither been exposed to Vesicular Stomatitis nor located within an area where Vesicular Stomatitis has been diagnosed."

• Note that cattle coming from California and Michigan have different requirements, due to confirmed cases of bovine TB in those areas.

• There are also additional requirements for bringing dairy cattle in from other countries, including Canada. Requirements are written and maintained by each state. Find more information here.

Brand inspection:
A brand inspection (to verify ownership) is also required prior to the movement of cattle to an out-of-state destination. That means it’s required by the state you live in. In my state, for the purpose of leaving the state or going to slaughter, a brand inspection is good for only 96 hours, and all livestock must be brand inspected whether the animal is actually branded or not. My inspection was handled by the Idaho Brand Inspector at the Idaho State Police at 208-799-5019, who came to my farm to do the inspection. In Idaho, we also have an “annual brand inspection,” good for up to 12 months and designed to allow livestock owners to travel in and out of the state of Idaho to our neighboring states annually (but it can’t be used for slaughter, sale, or trade). We have reciprocal agreements with most all of our neighboring states, except the states of Montana and Wyoming. So, even though I could have used an annual brand inspection for transporting my bull for semen collection, I still couldn’t use it because my bull was going to Montana to the Genex facility for collection.

Remember, to transport your cattle, you’ll always need:
• Official Identification in the form of ear tags (also need an orange ear tag or ear tattoo for all females to show they’ve been vaccinated for Brucellosis)
• a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (health certificate)
• a Brand Inspection (only good for 96 hours)
• a Trich Test (only good for 30 days) or a virgin bull statement
• a TB Test (only good for 60 days)

In addition, you might need other tests (such as the VS example above) required by the destination state.









MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~

Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Oct 27 2014 :  5:31:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Is there anyway this post can be put into a PDFs so it can be printed and put with the book and other important cow Docs?

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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maryjane

6942 Posts


Posted - Oct 27 2014 :  5:43:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Gabe is here until 8 tonight. Let me see if he can do that.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Oct 27 2014 :  5:45:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks MJ. If it is in a file I am sure he can convert it.

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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maryjane

6942 Posts


Posted - Oct 27 2014 :  5:48:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
BTW, I think I have it all correct. Phew. If I have any updates, I've made this post "sticky" so it stays at the top and will include any updates either by me or someone else.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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maryjane

6942 Posts


Posted - Oct 27 2014 :  5:56:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The problem with a PDF is some of the links (website URLs) are VERY long and you'd have to type each letter in from a printed version. It can be done! That's how Gabe said he'd have to do it. He'll post a link to the PDF here when it's done.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Oct 27 2014 :  6:12:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for all the work. I know most of this but never knew why. Just did it.

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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NellieBelle

11074 Posts


Posted - Oct 27 2014 :  6:16:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow MaryJane, thank you for all the work in gathering information to help educate us.
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HeritageJersey

23 Posts
HJO
Moscow ID
USA

Posted - Oct 27 2014 :  6:45:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here is a PDF version:
Transporting Dairy Cattle.pdf
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Oct 27 2014 :  6:56:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Gabe. Looks great.

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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farmlife

1413 Posts


Posted - Oct 28 2014 :  06:08:25 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That looks like a huge amount of work, but thanks so much! We all are a little better educated now.

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maryjane

6942 Posts


Posted - Oct 28 2014 :  06:17:32 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good morning Keeley,
When you post here, can you click on the Reply to Topic, that is to the right of New Topic in the top line that's right under the most recent post? That way, you won't be bringing the entire post you're replying to into your post as a quote. I've been deleting those small-print parts of your posts when I see them, but I don't think I'm finding all of them. Thanks much!!!! This one was particularly long on redundancy because the way you did it brought my entire Transporting Cattle into your post.

Will you be meeting Jewel soon?

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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farmlife

1413 Posts


Posted - Oct 28 2014 :  8:03:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
So sorry, MaryJane! If it's not bad enough I ask so many questions, now I'm creating more online work for you. Yikes! I met Jewel and the rest of the crew today. Still thinking. I'll keep you posted.
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txbikergirl

3197 Posts


Posted - Sep 19 2015 :  12:55:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
COW CAM!!

give lover boy a little extra time on his hands and you get a new electronic thingamajig... and so we now get to watch the cows on our way home from idaho!

he didn't want to pay $300 for a gopro camera and all the fancy schmancy stuff, but found this setup for $100 on amazon and spent an evening wiring the truck and putting it all in. his livelyhood is network engineering with videconferencing around the world so he knows all things video, audio, computer and electronic.

this is our trip home from tractor supply today, got the pine shavings and water tank we need for the trip home with the cows.


Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
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NellieBelle

11074 Posts


Posted - Sep 19 2015 :  1:00:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That is smart Cindy. Takes a lot of stress out of hauling animals I would think. Keeping a watchful eye on them the whole trip will put your mind a little more to ease. Thanks for sharing.

To laugh is human but to moo is bovine. Author Unknown
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maryjane

6942 Posts


Posted - Sep 19 2015 :  1:04:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I love my cow cam. You're right Janet, it's nice to see how everyone is doing.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Sep 20 2015 :  1:31:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That looks great, Cindy! That will be very nice to be able to see what your cows are up to while driving.

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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SpringMaiden1

27 Posts


Posted - Sep 20 2015 :  10:58:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by txbikergirl

COW CAM!!

give lover boy a little extra time on his hands and you get a new electronic thingamajig... and so we now get to watch the cows on our way home from idaho!

he didn't want to pay $300 for a gopro camera and all the fancy schmancy stuff, but found this setup for $100 on amazon and spent an evening wiring the truck and putting it all in. his livelyhood is network engineering with videconferencing around the world so he knows all things video, audio, computer and electronic.

this is our trip home from tractor supply today, got the pine shavings and water tank we need for the trip home with the cows.



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SpringMaiden1

27 Posts


Posted - Sep 20 2015 :  10:59:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is exactly what I need. What is the name of the camera?
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txbikergirl

3197 Posts


Posted - Sep 21 2015 :  5:02:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
miss debbie, the cow cam is:

pyle camera #PLCMTR72
http://www.amazon.com/Pyle-PLCMTR72-Weatherproof-Rearview-Monitor/dp/B00WR6ZR8U/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1442879899&sr=8-1&keywords=pyle+camera+%23PLCMTR72

this is a two camera system, so you can have two cameras in your trailer.

comes with (2) 50' cables, but lover boy bought a 5 meter cable so that we could have the camera wired all the way from the truck dashboard down through the truckbed, then it could have a connection on the trailer/hitch so it was a natural break and never had to be rewired. (5M black 4 pin connector M/F power cable for car monitor system).

they also make wireless systems, but then you have to have power in your trailer. lover boy is the computer guy, and he just wanted simple hook/unhook system on the kitch.

Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
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SpringMaiden1

27 Posts


Posted - Nov 08 2015 :  1:10:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you so much! Since being in the process of moving, I've put off getting ready to pick my cows up and
now am trying to get everything done the last minute.

Luckily my son is a computer tech!

I'm really getting nervous and excited about getting the cows. I ended up with a second one since the young
lady who has them has decided, with four children six and under, she should probably wait awhile before
she does this again. But luckily for me, they are so tame with her and the children around them all the time,
they are going to be so perfect for me.

I'll will be on here constantly in December with questions! Thanks so much!

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txbikergirl

3197 Posts


Posted - Nov 08 2015 :  2:44:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
hope the travels go well for you debbie. my cow adventure since getting home a month ago has been wonderful, not bad surprises but a sick calf for a few days a week ago with a cold that went into a respiratory thing. for about two seconds i thought my calf was dead, and then i thought, "oh my goodness how can i tell mary jane this??!"... seriously, more worried about mary jane than lover boy!

Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
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