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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - May 20 2015 :  5:30:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Zen time...become one with the cow.......ooooooommmmmm. 😀

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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farmlife

1413 Posts


Posted - May 20 2015 :  7:40:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I find myself becoming one with the cow while I milk in the morning and then coming into the house only to find I'm late! It's easy to get lost in the milking time and forget the world is still spinning. Just one more week of school and then I can more easily become one with the cow. :)
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Jul 06 2015 :  10:48:02 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This weekend MaryJane was very gracious to loan me her Quik Milker to give my hand with stitches a chance to heal. I am not milking any cows yet; but, rather, I am milking four goats twice a day. It has been a good experience to actually try a milking machine. I did just use the same half gallon glass jar and when it was filled, I dumped it into my large milk can.

While I do like the idea of the foot pump so you are not using any electricity, it does take a bit to keep it at the proper suction. And, the goats are always waiting on me trying to get the suction to the proper level before putting the inflation tubes on their teats. And every time the half gallon jar is full and you have to dump it, you lose all suction again. Pump, pump, pump like mad! Anyone else using the Quik Milker notice the same thing?

It is quiet and my goats who have always been hand-milked had no problem in the slightest to being machine-milked. That was fantastic! And, I was just a tad bit proud of my does! :-)

The other thing I noticed was that I still could get more milk out by hand after the machine had quit getting milk. I am not sure if that happens with all machines and all animals. What do others find? I realize I am comparing my goats to everyone else's cows, but that's all I have currently. I was just concerned if I didn't milk out my goats completely, they would start producing less milk ...

So, when you all milk your cows with a machine, can you still get a few cups worth of milk out of each teat by hand afterwards? I'm wondering if it is the type of machine, or just all milking machines do the same thing.

We have an older electric milking machine that I might try next. I'm still cleaning it out (ok, the truth is my son is cleaning it! Trying to keep my hand relatively clean and germ-free). But the motor is extremely loud so I am wanting to make the hoses long enough so that the pump itself can be outside and away from the goats' milking stand. That, too, has a small holding pail for the milk so I will be stopping the process midway and dumping it into the larger milk pail. I also notice that my goats start to lose momentum with their let-down as soon as I disrupt the process to empty the milk container. Does that happen with the cows, too?

Lots of questions ... just wanting to get more information before I am milking Clover. Just seven weeks or so away! But who's counting!?!

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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maryjane

7044 Posts


Posted - Jul 06 2015 :  11:33:24 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm thinking you have a pressure problem, Charlene. Keeley was asking about that also with her QuikMilker. You know where the tubes go into the inflation? The folks who built it had sealed those with a hard epoxy that promptly cracked and fell off as it sat in storage. Try wrapping some electrician's tape around those junctions just to see if you get better pressure. It should work like the EZ in terms of how long it takes to get a goat milked and the amount of pressure the pumping gives you. When I used the QuikMilker, it held pressure without much foot pumping at all, so I think there is a leak somewhere. And it should empty the teat out completely like you saw the EZ do--shriveled the teats right up!

If you want to drop it off tonight after you milk, I can monkey around with it tomorrow morning when I milk and troubleshoot what's happening.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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maryjane

7044 Posts


Posted - Jul 06 2015 :  11:37:45 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Also, remember when I said I'd recently cracked the plastic overflow cup on my EZ? Well, the first day I used it after I'd mended it with duct tape and it seemed like that sealed it but it didn't. I had to go back to the drawing board and use silicon sealant before I could get good pressure again. Even the tiniest breach will affect your pressure.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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farmlife

1413 Posts


Posted - Jul 11 2015 :  09:05:40 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here are a couple of tricks I've found helpful, Charlene. Give the inflations a little turn as you attach them to the hard plastic cups as you assemble the machine. That often sucks them down just a little more. If there is any gap at all between the inflations and the plastic you'll have an air leak. Make sure you put the teat cups on the teats before you start pumping the foot pump. I've found on Elli's front teats, which I imagine are shaped more like a goat's teats, it helps if I put a little avocado or olive oil on them to help the machine suction on well. Also as I start pumping I push the inflations up into the udder gently until I've got the vacuum gauge up to 5. Then I let them hang. I usually just pump fast at the beginning to establish suction and then just maintain the gauge somewhere between 5 and 10. Now that I have it figured out it usually is just a few pumps here and there. Feel free to adjust the pressure based on how fast the milk is going through the tubes.

I find it easier to take a crate of jars out and just switch the lid because then I don't have to take the inflations totally off. That's why I like to do one at a time if I'm by myself. I hold the inflation with one hand while I switch the jar lids around with the other hand. It's easier to build suction again that way because the teat has already taken the shape of the inflation. I also find it's cleaner to use multiple jars than dumping the same jar over and over. Also if you ever have a time when it seems like the inflations are sucking into the udder and creating kind of a pucker where the udder is starting to hang over as it empties, it helps to gently pull down on the inflation and it will continue working. There were times when I could see the milk, but it wasn't coming out when her udder was puckered looking. If you leave it on like that it creates kind of a "hard ring" inside her teat up by the udder that makes it hard to strip her out by hand afterward. I always still have to strip Elli out by hand when I'm done with the machine. This morning I got about two gallons of milk and I did about 6 cups by hand. With Elli though, I think it is a matter of holding on to some milk for Gus, but since I've never milked her when she wasn't feeding a calf I'm not sure. Even when I milk her out by hand at the end and then let her out she still magically lets down a lot of milk for Gus. I don't really blame her. She's a good mama and he has a hard head!
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farmlife

1413 Posts


Posted - Jul 11 2015 :  10:23:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Charlene, I saw in one of your other posts that it is taking you more time to machine milk than to hand milk. It takes me about the same amount of time for either. I find when I machine milk the milking takes less time, but dish doing takes more and when I hand milk the milking takes longer. All in all it is still about an hour. I imagine it take less time when you get the machine figured out. There is a definite learning curve with the Quik Milker.
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Jul 11 2015 :  9:59:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Your thoughts help so much, Keeley! Thank you. I was thinking machine milking was significantly quicker than hand milking and this helps my mind set. I want to be realistic about the whole thing. My goal this week is to get my older milking machine up and running as I ordered new tubing and inflations. I will practice a bunch with my goats so it becomes second nature to me like hand milking is already. And knowing you stripped out about six cups is extremely helpful! But I was letting the vacuum gauge get closer to 20 ... poor goats! Their teats ... oh my! Some day I would like the Quik Milker as a back up so I have something that doesn't take electricity.

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Jul 21 2015 :  11:42:40 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
So... Txbikergirl ... what do you think about milkers now that you used MaryJane's set up? Thoughts, opinions, observations?? I'd love to hear your thoughts.

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Jul 21 2015 :  11:44:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I am planning on selling my Hoegger milking system and want to get the EZ milker that MaryJane uses, unless someone changes my mind. :-)

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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maryjane

7044 Posts


Posted - Jul 21 2015 :  5:22:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Cindy's feedback would be ideal for you Charlene.

I'd like to add to Cindy's training something that happened this morning with Julie who's been coming early on Tuesdays and Thursdays to train. She was milking Sally O'Mally and was still milking her first two teats. All seemed well so I stepped out. When I came back she'd switched to the front two and the one that obviously had some milk in it wasn't giving any. We checked the lines (no kinks), we checked our pressure (fine), we gave a gentle tug on the inflation (usually that will trigger milk). We took the bottle off and put it on again. Nothing. Julie was getting ready to dump the other bottle and since I was out of ideas for what to try next, I said, "Dump it and put that bottle on the teat." When she did, it started to give milk. I think it was just a coincidence. Or perhaps when the teat got sucked in both times, the orifice was against the side. My point being, that with all my milking machines, I have to problem solve along the way. Sounds like Keeley has had to do likewise with her Quik Milker. It seems to go with the territory, no matter the machine.

In addition to ease of clean-up, what I like most about the EZ is the fact that you can see the teat and the milk coming out. It's very visual and also allows you to customize how long each teat is under pressure. With my NuPulse, all four inflations go on and you can't see the milk coming out of the orifice or see the teat and you can barely tell from looking into the clear plastic claw which teats have maybe quit giving milk.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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txbikergirl

3197 Posts


Posted - Jul 21 2015 :  6:49:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
hi charlene, been meaning to step over here and add my thoughts. these are my thoughts on the Ultimate EZ Milker.

PRE MILKING THOUGHTS

i assumed i would NOT care for machine milking because:
- i prefer old school versus machine
- i thought clean up would be overwhelming and take too much time
- i thought milking into small bottles that you routinely dump into a larger pail was silly
- i didn't like the thought of milking into plastic bottles instead of glass or metal

i am NOT a machine girl, but NOT for many reasons others might be. i can operate machines well, have no intimidation with them, am a very good troubleshooter, and in my daily life am extremely high-tech. but in my private life i am low tech as i like the relaxation of a manual process. so if i need to chop veggies i prefer the knife over the food processor, if i can whip it by hand i'll grab a whisk instead of the blender, etc. i find the manual processes simple, easy on the mind, and enjoyable.

so i went into the milking experience knowing i needed to use a milker as i don't have the strength and dexterity to hand milk a cow, open to the idea since there was no way out, but sure that i wouldn't appreciate the experience.

POST MILKING THOUGHTS
so... i was at mary jane's and used the EZ Milker for three days (the first of which i mostly just observed, assisted, and cleaned up). after the first day being somewhat on the sidelines i thought it looked simple to use, and as i did the clean up got first hand experience on how simple that was. i was interested.

on day two i was sold. after just assisting the first day i was able to setup the unit all by myself on the second day, and understood exactly what to do. its all so logical, and there aren't that many parts. you have two bottles that go onto the teats to get the milk, and then there are two hoses and one goes to each bottle to create a vacumn, and there is one other hose that goes from those hoses to the motor. thats about all you mess with, other than the teat attachments at the top of the bottles. seriously, very simple.

so trouble shooting becomes simple as well. the two times nothing was happening we could just look over the few pieces and see what the issue was (i had forgot to close the clip on the hose and didn't have a vacumn created). to me it was very logical to trouble shoot by just starting at the teat where it connects to the bottle, from there to the hose, the clip, the other hose, and the motor. this is a brilliant but not complex machine from the users standpoint.

i also found the small bottles perfect. for a mid-size or small cow the size fits under the cows easy enough, and since they are so small that is what allows them to go directly on the teats - otherwise it would be too heavy and you would have to have additional hoses running the milk into the bottles. this design is what creates minimal clean up. and the see through teat attachments and bottles let you get a good idea of what is going on - essentially for a newbie, but valuable for any level of experience. i could see if the udder was running dry, if the teat was shrinking up, if no milk was coming out, etc... it let me really monitor the process. it let me troubleshoot my own lack of milking experience in order to do it better. if i couldn't see the teats how in the world would i do that?

and it was easy to just grab the bottle, use the other hand to close the clip on the hose to shut off suction, and pull the bottle off the teat. then dump the bottle into the milk pail and put the bottle back on a teat.

the two bottle system was nice as i could attach one, then take my time attaching the other, then monitor them both and pull one off in time to dump and return it well before the next one was ready. the process wasn't slow by any means, although you do have to dump each bottle quite a few times. but this to me is the process of milking - i am not rushing, i am there to enjoy the time with the cow, and so doing the bottles one after another was relaxing. and if they were filling too fast you could always pull one off and just sit it down in your bowl while you attended to the other one. so you never need to rush, just pay attention and do it at your own pace - even if that is just using one bottle at a time.

what is also nice about this system is that if an accident happens, the sh%%^& hits the fan, etc - all the milk already milked and dumped into the milking pail will be safe - so the only ruined milk would be the stuff in the bottles on the cow right then... and even they are sealed, but just to be safe that milk could be tossed out without feeling as if your entire milking session was a waste.

clean up was a breeze. seriously. a little warm water to rinse the bottles and hoses, the proper soap to get the fat out of the bottles and clean hoses, and a little bleach solution to sterilize it all... then let it air dry, and the next milking session just rinse out the bleach in all items and take about 30 seconds to attach the teat attachments to the bottles and hoses to the bottles. thats it, ready to go...

i decided i like the plastic bottles too. they are light weight, good for small hands like mine and not heavy at all on the teat or in my hand when full of milk. they do make glass bottles, but i don't think i want the extra weight on the cow or my hands, and the chance of the bottles hitting each other during the process and breaking isn't worth the risk to me or the cow.

WRAP UP
Keep in mind this is the only machine i have personally used, but i have been reading about machines for over a year and keep coming back to reviews done by people that milk personally for their own use. i constantly hear about how long machines take to clean, and to me that would completely ruin the experience. this machine is simple to use, gets the job done perfectly, but is also a joy to use because of its simplicity.

if i wasn't completely ecstatic about it i would go trying others out and looking for alternatives, but my enjoyable experience combined with MJ's various reviews and experience leads me to believe this is the winning solution for me.

Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
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txbikergirl

3197 Posts


Posted - Jul 21 2015 :  7:01:11 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
mj this is exactly what i appreciated about the EZ Milker. the fact that i could see everything happening all the time, so directly after i attached onto the teat i could look for the milk, move it a bit if it hadn't started, etc. and a couple of times i too had to pull the bottle off and reattach - as i got the teat pushed up against the side a bit and it was not milking right.

this machine not only makes milking simple, but it does allow a lot of learning for us newbies - the visual experience makes all the difference to me. i am not from a farming background so have no experience beyond what i have been soaking up the past few years. being able to see all the "action" so easily is a huge plus for me.

Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
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farmlife

1413 Posts


Posted - Jul 21 2015 :  7:55:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I like the Quik Milker, but I wouldn't encourage anyone to buy it. I've tried twice to get in contact with the manufacturers to ask questions and twice I got no response. I tried a third time last week because it wasn't holding suction at all, and I actually did get a call back including a cell phone number to contact them. After much troubleshooting on our part the machine is magically working again, but I don't know for how long. I haven't called to talk to them yet, but I will and will also post the results here. I will say that since I bought it their warranty has gone from one year to three months. I'm not even sure my machine is under warranty since I couldn't get to the site to register it. That was the first contact I made with them. We'll see what they say.
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NellieBelle

11179 Posts


Posted - Jul 22 2015 :  04:11:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is all great information. I haven't used the Quik Milker, only read others experiences with it. I have the Ultimated EZ milker and it's just that. EZ. I've never had any problems with it, always milks out the teats, and clean up is easy also. The actual milking after pre-cleaning teats/udder is only about 10 minutes. So I will be purchasing another Ultimate EZ just to have on hand if the one I'm using should develop a problem. I've strengthened my arms and hands for hand milking too, so in a snap I could hand milk but it takes much longer. Thank you all for your informative feedback. Much appreciated.

To laugh is human but to moo is bovine. Author Unknown
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Jul 22 2015 :  11:09:00 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you, thank you, Cindy for your thoughts! Some of your beginning concerns were exactly what mine are/were. We are selling our hoegger milking system and will be ordering an EZ milking machine. One of my biggest issues with the Hoegger is that I cannot see the milk and have no idea when the pail is full. You also reassured me regarding the plastic bottles or should we say you pushed me over the edge as I was already impressed with the bottles when MJ let me watch her milk and I was able to feel the bottles. These are no flimsy plastic bottles, but rather sturdy ones, easily cleaned.

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens

Edited by - CloversMum on Jul 22 2015 11:13:08 AM
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txbikergirl

3197 Posts


Posted - Jul 22 2015 :  5:30:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
glad to help charlene! you will have clover in milk before miss sally comes home to texas so i look forward to hearing your experiences.

as you might have guessed i have been quite excited the past few months looking forward to miss sally, but this milking machine now eases my mind about getting the daily job done ;> there is nothing i am anxious over now, mary jane was so generous with her training and information that i am feeling really great about this.

Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Jul 22 2015 :  5:46:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
And you should feel great about all of this, Cindy! You've done such a great job preparing for all of it ... and are getting some star cows in September.

We are selling a chicken coop and our older milking machine ... as soon as one of them sells, I'm purchasing the EZ milker. I cannot wait!

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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txbikergirl

3197 Posts


Posted - Jul 24 2015 :  1:30:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Want everyone to know how GREAT the customer service is at the EZ Milker office. buck himself answered the phone, took about twenty minutes to explain everything to me, and then instead of just telling me to order it on the web he took the order himself and processed it right then so he could ship it out today. do i need it shipped out today? no... but its just the great attitude and courtesy that is refreshing in this day and age.

he also said they just got their first solar units in, mary jane has mentioned them before, but they aren't on the website yet. they are about $250 more than just the milker ($795 for solar and milking machine complete kit), but the basic milker is the same so he is going to have an "add-on" special for anyone with the milking machine to just purchase the solar/cart. it also comes with a car cigarette adapter for mobile use. sounds like he thought of everything. i think mj said it can milk 80 times or so before recharging.. pretty amazing.

finally, as i mentioned before i wanted to get the little hand pump device in case our electrical is out or i need to milk outside the parlor in an emergency. instead of buying both the machine and hand kits, for $99 you can add on the hand pump part to the machine kit order as it uses all the same exact equipment as the machine does... so just one extra piece.

Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Jul 26 2015 :  6:50:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I am ordering an EZ milker tomorrow as one of our chicken coops sold! Hurray!

Cindy, can you list everything you ordered for your EZ milker? The extra parts that you decided to keep on hand, too.

Great info regarding the hand pump device ... as far as I am concerned that could easily take the place of the solar panel in case of emergencies. But down the road, I'm very interested in the solar unit.

MJ advised to order extra lines, bottles, spare inflations (what size did you get?), extra cleaning brush, and an overflow canister. Did you get anything more?

Thanks in advance!

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens

Edited by - CloversMum on Jul 26 2015 7:04:04 PM
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txbikergirl

3197 Posts


Posted - Jul 27 2015 :  12:21:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Charlene,

congrats on the coop selling - fantastic! nothing better than a plan coming together. and honestly, since we went "pay as you go" years ago it got to be so much more rewarding to buy something as you work so hard to earn the cash by either working or selling something else... super rewarding.

here's my quick list, and then i'll send keith a copy of my email invoice so you can see what exactly it all cost.

Ultimate EZ Milker
Replacement hand pump
Replacement air line kit (hoses)
Replacement filter
Replacement inflations (small)
Bottle brush
Extra bottle set (2 bottles)

Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Jul 27 2015 :  1:42:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well, I done and did it! I ordered an Ultimate Ez Milker! Yippee!
(Can I just add a whole row of exclamation points to show my excitement?)

I ordered the replacement parts recommended by MaryJane and Cindy. Thank you to both of you!

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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txbikergirl

3197 Posts


Posted - Jul 27 2015 :  5:58:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
charlene, i would think it would be soooo easy for you since you are an experienced milker. i was trying to figure out the cow cleaning, milking and machine all at once... so you can totally do this. easy peasy.

just take an hour to familiarize yourself with the parts (could take just 15 minutes - its that easy). and the first milking just take your time to really understand what it is doing. you could do one teat at a time that first milking (making sure the clip is closed on the second line). the videos online are really great.

did he tell you he also has the FOUR teat milking add-on? its just an attachment that lets the blue main air cord take 4 lines/bottles instead of 2. really cheap. i just wasn't ready to commit to milking all 4 teats at once yet but maybe after several months. but i don't feel the need to rush my milking, i want to take the time to really spoil sally and enjoy myself every day.

Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Jul 28 2015 :  08:23:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I will probably spend more than an hour to familiarize myself with the parts as it will feel more like a treat than an obligation! And, I did not get the 4 teat milking add-on ... I'm with you, not ready to take on all four teats at one time! It certainly did not take MJ long to milk her cows using just the 2 teat option. I don't mind sitting there a smidge longer ... at the moment milking my goats is my quiet time so adding a bit more quiet time to my day with Clover's milking does not bother me a bit.

And, I agree wholeheartedly with you Cindy, pay as you go is the most excellent way to do it.

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Jul 28 2015 :  11:21:26 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just an add-on for the Ultimate EZ milker... yesterday I placed an order on-line. This morning, Buck Wheeler, the owner called me to talk to me personally! Great customer service for sure!! And my unit is being shipped today. His solar unit is being delivered this week and they will price it next week ... and current customers will be able to order it with free shipping through the end of the year. Sounds like a smart extension. He also explained how a person can milk more than one cow at a time ... or in my case, a couple of goats or a goat and a cow (but Clover is not with my goats so that wouldn't happen). At this point, I will keep to milking one animal at a time ... I want to take that time to love and spoil my girls.

Anyway, I'm pleased with the customer service thus far! Mr. Wheeler was polite, helpful, and just a down-to-earth nice guy to chat with.

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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