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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Dec 18 2015 :  08:56:25 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What are you all making for the holidays using your milk?

I was looking through MJ's book and found a simple recipe for chocolate milk syrup. My youngest loves ice cream with chocolate as a topping ... now I'll have some made up for him with real ingredients!

Also, I think I'll try to make some sweetened condensed milk as I may make a family recipe for fudge that uses that ... how long does it stay good in the refrigerator after making it?


Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens

Ashley

166 Posts


Posted - Dec 18 2015 :  11:12:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The sweetened condensed milk should be good for 7 days. If you want it to keep longer, you could pressure can it. :)

I feel so behind on my planning. The holidays really snuck up on me this year. Today, my sister, her little ones, my mom, and grandma are coming to visit and do some baking. I hope they have a plan because I don't. :) I've thought about making some lefse because Adria really likes it and I have some sugar cookie dough that I made earlier this week in my fridge, but that's about it. After my cup of coffee tonight, I might be a little more inspired!

Ashley (MaryJane's DIL)
MaryJanesFarm Food Guru
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Dec 18 2015 :  12:09:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good to know about the sweetened condensed milk ... thank you, Ashley.

We've done lefse too! Are you Swedish? My hubby's grandma spoke Swedish and we usually try to have a semi- Swedish Christmas eve dinner. Lignonberry sauce, Swedish meatballs, potatoes ... this year, I'm adding some Lobster Bisque for just those of us who like it. Why waste it?

And, I'm behind as well ... that's what makes those cookie dough logs so much fun! :-) And sugar cookie dough would not last in my fridge ... too many little fingers snitching a treat!

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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Ashley

166 Posts


Posted - Dec 18 2015 :  2:26:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yum! Your dinner sounds wonderful Charlene! I am Swedish & Norwegian but we're not traditional. Lefse is one thing I remember my grandma making, so every once in awhile I think about it and crave it. Since Adria likes it, I have even more incentive.

I think my girls are too little to sneak into the fridge to steal nibbles just yet, so I'm lucky. Not sure how long it'll last, but I'll take it! Your cookie dough logs sound tasty. I love ginger-molasses cookies!

Ashley (MaryJane's DIL)
MaryJanesFarm Food Guru
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txbikergirl

3197 Posts


Posted - Dec 18 2015 :  6:57:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
you girls are making me drool. i haven't done ANY holiday baking yet. pathetic. but my super eager farmgirl-wanna-be 29 year old niece arrives tuesday with my SIL and 16 year old niece so we'll be baking from 12/22 on.. nonstop through 12/29. she's ecstatic to milk the cow and take care of the cows.

Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
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Andrea0509

155 Posts


Posted - Dec 18 2015 :  9:34:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Glad to hear I'm not alone in not having done much holiday baking! I just used some store-bought sweetened condensed milk in a recipie today. It's fun hearing how you all find uses for all of the extra milk.

I planned a day for my 4 year old daughter and myself to make homemade Christmas cookies last weekend. It was exactly how my mom, sister and I used to make them growing up every Christmas, same family recipe and all. My daughter remembered it was our cookie baking day right when she woke up, she was so excited and had been looking forward to it all week. Loved spending the time with her!



Edited by - Andrea0509 on Dec 18 2015 9:38:00 PM
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NellieBelle

11176 Posts


Posted - Dec 19 2015 :  03:38:56 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That is absolutely adorable. One for the memory book for sure. Thanks for sharing. Fine little baker in the family.

To laugh is human but to moo is bovine. Author Unknown
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maryjane

7039 Posts


Posted - Dec 19 2015 :  10:04:49 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you for sharing your adorable daughter with us. What a cutie-pie. I have two of my grandgirls here this morning and likewise we have some baking planned.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Dec 19 2015 :  12:00:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What precious memories, Andrea! And yummy cookies!

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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txbikergirl

3197 Posts


Posted - Dec 19 2015 :  5:32:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
andrea that is wonderful. i remember baking and icing christmas cookies with my mom, so wonderful. i actually plan to do that with my nieces next week too, you never outgrow that.

i sold myself short earlier, it dawned on me today that i forgot to share my candied oranges i am making. i make these for my mom every year, it is her single favorite treat in the world. it takes two weeks to make them as you cook them a bit each evening then sit them aside to marinate and do that for 3 days, then let sit for 4 days, then cook once more and cut into strips and then dry out for 7 days. then we dip some in chocolate and leave some just plain. i'll post photos when i am done next week, this is the first or second day of cooking them.


Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
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NellieBelle

11176 Posts


Posted - Dec 20 2015 :  09:15:27 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That is so cool Cindy. Thanks for sharing. I can't say I've ever heard of it. I imagine the flavor is out of this world good. Learn something new everyday. :)

To laugh is human but to moo is bovine. Author Unknown
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txbikergirl

3197 Posts


Posted - Dec 20 2015 :  6:08:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
thanks charlene, we always learn something new on HJO!

today i pulled them out of marinating and now they sit and dry until christmas morning. then we'll cut them into strips and wrap them in waxed paper. this is five large navel oranges.


Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
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Andrea0509

155 Posts


Posted - Dec 20 2015 :  6:37:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks all! I love my sweet little baking helper!
Cindy, your candied oranges sound amazing! What a process and labor of love. Your mom will love them for sure :)

Hobby farming with my husband & two kids in beautiful Michigan ~ 1 Jersey; Miss Persimmon, 2 Olde English Southdown ewes; Lula & Clementine, and chickens to come Spring 2016. Loving the adventure!
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Dec 20 2015 :  7:26:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Such fun things to make! Cindy, do you eat the peel as well after its been candied? Or just the pulp part? As you can tell, I've never had candied oranges!


Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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txbikergirl

3197 Posts


Posted - Dec 21 2015 :  7:29:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
thanks andrea. charlene, you eat the peel. in fact it is only the peel that goes into this, you peel the oranges and then you and your hubby feast on orange slices while you start these the first night ;> the peel is simmered in a sugar syrup and that breaks down the peel and makes it soft. it might be the consistency of a caramel candy in the end - soft but not limp. it is very orangey, but sweet and soft. you can actually buy candied oranges in a box this time of year that are chocolate dipped ;>


Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
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maryjane

7039 Posts


Posted - Dec 21 2015 :  7:53:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Lemon peel anyone? Same concept but not as labor intensive.
http://www.raisingjane.org/journal/59085


MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Dec 21 2015 :  9:47:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, MaryJane! Could you substitute orange peels into your recipe? Although I think that some candied lemon peels would be amazing in hot tea.

Candied oranges dipped in chocolate sound decadent!

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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maryjane

7039 Posts


Posted - Dec 23 2015 :  06:33:13 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I haven't tried it with orange peels. I'll see if Ashley has. Yes, VERY good in tea.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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Ashley

166 Posts


Posted - Dec 23 2015 :  07:59:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I did try this with orange peels and they candied well, but were a little bitter. I just used navel oranges, but maybe an orange with less pith (like satsumas) wouldn't be as bitter.

Ashley (MaryJane's DIL)
MaryJanesFarm Food Guru
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Dec 23 2015 :  09:12:13 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks! I think I'll stick with candied lemon (might try it today as I printed out the recipe) as I'm drinking more tea than coffee these days. I think, too, having some in the freezer to quickly pull out as garnish for cakes or other desserts would be nice. I'd look gourmet even though I'm certainly not!

I do have two different kinds of oranges right now (I don't know what the "cutie" oranges are) so I could try a couple. Otherwise, it sounds like the elaborate process that Cindy does would do it.

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Dec 24 2015 :  08:07:26 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Any favorite wonderful recipe for hot chocolate using Jersey milk?

I made some yesterday using Dutch cocoa and the recipe on the back of the can ... youngest didn't like it. I want to find a great recipe so he'll start drinking Clover's milk.

There is a recipe in MJ's book for chocolate syrup ... is that the one to make and then just add to warm milk? I was really hoping for just a one pan deal ... not to have chocolate syrup in my fridge (too much of a temptation for me!).

Anyone?

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens

Edited by - CloversMum on Dec 24 2015 08:14:31 AM
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maryjane

7039 Posts


Posted - Dec 24 2015 :  8:32:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'll ask Ashley what she does when I see her tomorrow. I know Adria loves hot chocolate.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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txbikergirl

3197 Posts


Posted - Dec 25 2015 :  6:30:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
you need a thick orange peel to make it work, so navel oranges work really well. this actually makes a HUGE difference in the outcome as i have tried different oranges throughout the years, all types of fancy varieties, and simple thick peel navels work the best.

i have also tried recipes that only boil once in a setting and also go into the oven for drying and it isn't the same - at least for the oranges. it is the boil in syrup, marinate for a day, and repeat for 3 days that really gets it going - and then marinating for 4 days to candy that peel. then dry for a week and it is all loveliness. i also think it is this process that eliminates the bitterness, at least in the oranges.

i think it also depends on what you are looking for - my mom likes the thick sliced candied peel that is very moist. the lemon recipe looks absolutely delicious, but a different result.

i will try it with lemon some time and see how it turns out. always wanted too, and the right time of year for the lemon tree harvest, just need to find some time. i think i should try mary janes recipe and compare it with the one i have to see the difference between the two.


Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")

Edited by - txbikergirl on Dec 25 2015 6:36:06 PM
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Dec 26 2015 :  08:51:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
All good things to those who wait ... and marinate orange peels for days and days and days. :-) Some day I want to try your recipe, Cindy. I'm just afraid now I'd forget half way through what I was doing and mess it all up! But I'm printing off your recipe and tucking into my kitchen copy of Milk Cow Kitchen.

For some reason, I've always wanted a lemon tree ... only they wouldn't survive up here in Idaho. But I've wondered if I could grow one inside the house. We have huge south facing windows so I think there might be enough light ... but lemon trees aren't cheap and I wouldn't want to get one to watch it shrivel up!

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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farmlife

1413 Posts


Posted - Dec 29 2015 :  7:23:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I got a lemon and a lime tree when the greenhouse had things on clearance this summer, Charlene. They've been in the house exclusively, but seem to have contracted some kind of bugs. I tried dish soap and water to rid them of the bugs, but it didn't work. Not sure what else would work that I want to use.

We went over to some friends' house a few weeks ago that we share some of Elli's milk with. They made homemade hot chocolate with Elli's milk that was really good. I'll have to ask for the recipe. It started with unsweetened chocolate squares.
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Dec 29 2015 :  9:20:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Keeley. Yes, let me know what the hot chocolate recipe was if you get it.

Bugs, eh? Are the bugs killing the trees? We need Janet to diagnose and recommend treatment! Or perhaps, Sydney would know.

Janet posted on another thread that her mother grew citrus trees inside the house. They pollenated using paintbrushes! I think it was on the daily chat, dated 12/26 or 12/17.

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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