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farmlife

1413 Posts


Posted - Dec 04 2015 :  07:43:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Someone posted a while ago that there are certain signs to look for following an AI session to tell whether or not it was successful. Unfortunately I can't find where it was posted. Elli had a small amount of dried blood on her vulva last night. I'm not sure if that was a sign that the AI took or not. Does anyone else remember the post I'm talking about? Are there any other specific things I should be looking for as far as whether or not she is bred?

maryjane

6977 Posts


Posted - Dec 04 2015 :  09:20:04 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Keeley,
I've been told the "bleed off" method doesn't mean anything. I think that's what was posted here somewhere. About two days after a cow's heat, you may see blood, called the “bleed off. This is normal but not an indicator of whether or not she was bred.

I haven't heard of a reliable way to tell other than watching your calendar to see if they go into heat again in 19 to 21 days, or whatever her cycle has been. I put Lacy Lou in with Sir Charles and she was supposed to go into heat two days ago. (She's very regular every 21 days and REALLY lets you know she's available.) I can do a blood test in another week (30 days) to confirm but I'm sure she's pregnant.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Dec 04 2015 :  2:56:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm a newbie but the only way I've been able to tell is to look at the medical report after I drop off the blood work. :-) Last fall we took Clover over to MJ's farm multiple times because I was sure she was going back into heat! Nick and MaryJane were so kind and patient with me!

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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maryjane

6977 Posts


Posted - Dec 04 2015 :  4:47:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ah, we're just glad you're finally getting milk. All very worth it.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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txbikergirl

3197 Posts


Posted - Dec 05 2015 :  05:03:25 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
charlene you crack me up!

Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
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farmlife

1413 Posts


Posted - Dec 07 2015 :  05:18:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well Charlene, I'm right there with you. I was so excited because Elli's udder "shaved itself" before she calved. Now that the weather has turned colder I realize that it was only because she lost her winter coat because she calved at the end of April. We trimmed up hair around her teats yesterday now that she has her winter fuzz back everywhere. Newbies, what can you do?
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maryjane

6977 Posts


Posted - Dec 07 2015 :  06:50:31 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I shaved my girls yesterday. Here's a bit of TMI. When I do their udders, I also take the trimmers to their you-know-what. Cling-on free!!!

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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Andrea0509

155 Posts


Posted - Dec 07 2015 :  10:45:31 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thankful for reading this post today! We AI'd Miss Persimmon on Oct. 27th, and her first heat cycle came and went, didn't see a single sign that she went into heat. Her next heat cycle is due today or tomorrow. Working with our vet, we found a place here in MI that does the blood test for pregnancy for less than $3 per test. Hoping to get that done and sent out in the coming week because I want to know either way!! It's been quite the waiting game but I know you can all relate!
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maryjane

6977 Posts


Posted - Dec 07 2015 :  10:51:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Fingers crossed!!! If she is your vet can bring out a portable ultrasound between days 65 and 85 of her pregnancy and tell you the sex of your calf. I can never resist knowing. It helps me plan all sorts of things with a herd my size.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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maryjane

6977 Posts


Posted - Dec 07 2015 :  11:02:29 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Speaking of heat cycles, I've been worried about what would happen when my big girl Fanci (let me replace the word big with humongous) goes into heat now that her calf is approaching a month old. Well, she went into heat a couple of days ago and didn't bother anyone and no one bothered her (it would be like an elephant trying to hump you). Her vulva was swollen and she leaked blood for a couple of days and that's it. I don't want to breed her again, just milk her for a few years, so I'm relieved she won't need to be segregated.

Little Ester Lily is going into heat every 17 days (just my luck) and she's a total weird zombie when she's in heat. She approaches you with vacant eyes and a rather possessed look and will not be deterred. Run for your life! Lacy Lou would moo for two full days but she's pregnant now. Oh, give me a home where only pregnant girls roam ...

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Dec 07 2015 :  11:56:58 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Milking Fanci straight through for a few years sounds really nice ... no worrying about breeding, drying up, delivery, and a continuous supply of milk! Hurray!

Clover was in heat this weekend (so much moo-ing!)... we'll see what happens. I really need to get Betsy over to WSU where they can do a blood draw ... AND I can read the medical report! :-) No signs of heat so my fingers are crossed that she is indeed bred. I had one farmer tell me that Guernseys were hard to have successfully AI'd which makes me even more thankful for laid-back Mr. Tony bull.

Now, Keeley, you crack me up! Cows shaving themselves ... but really isn't it a joy to be on a farm and to be able to learn about all these things? Hopefully, our kids will be slightly more aware and learned ... they can take it to the next level. And, us newbies, have to be around to make the experienced cow owners look even better! :-)

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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farmlife

1413 Posts


Posted - Dec 07 2015 :  3:16:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm glad we are good for something, Charlene. It is a learning experience everyday, but certainly filled with joy!
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Andrea0509

155 Posts


Posted - Dec 10 2015 :  12:23:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just had our vet come out to do the blood draw out of Miss Persimmon's tail. Pregnancy test results are supposed to returned within 10 days. Wish it'd be sooner but then again it's already been 43 days since she was bred! Hoping for the best.

I definitely had sticker shock though...I remembered a farm call being pricey when I had horses but just to do a quick blood draw! Yikes. I about fell over...$55 for the call and then $20 to do the blood sample. I may have to muster up some courage and do it myself next time using Mary Jane's instructions in the book :)
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Dec 10 2015 :  1:42:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Muster the courage! Although I say that and I don't want to do the blood draws myself, either. But I can drop off the blood sample here locally and it costs under $10 and I find out the same day. So very thankful!

It's rather like waiting for Christmas! And, just think, you'll find out before Christmas ... you don't even have to wait. :-)

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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