Chatroom

[flourish]
 All Forums
 "You Bought WHAT?!"
 Pasture-fed vs. Grain-fed
 Grass vs. Grain
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Next Page
Author Topic
Page: of 3

maryjane

6764 Posts


Posted - Nov 23 2015 :  08:05:44 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
When it comes to milk production, I'm a big fan of an organic daily grain treat (concentrate with vitamins and DE added) to not only keep milk production up but to create an abundance of tasty, thick cream. Like I mentioned in my book, grains got a bad rap because of the over-use of them in the mega-production, mega-meat world. The same world in which they also feed chicken and cow remains to cattle. Yikes!! If you think about it in terms of marketing, what term would you use to set yourself apart? Grass-fed. When it comes to beef, the marketing image it instantly creates is quite the bucolic scene and definitely not a feedlot scene. It’s impossible to say 90% grass-fed. It doesn’t play into the simplicity people crave for deciding what they do and don’t want in their lives. Think about how difficult it would be to try to market your milk or your cows if you said something like “organic other than selective use of herbicides in order to keep my cattle alive after frost hits pasture.”

When you’re trying to sell something or buy something or adhere to a belief system, marketing and single-issue wordage has its down side. If you’ve been vegan for several years, but you’re losing strength in your muscles, the leap to eating steak and eggs is huge. It’s a crisis in faith actually. Here’s a personal example that comes to mind:

Thirty-six years ago (when my first child was born in 1979), I had a burning desire for a "natural childbirth." All the women in my family and Utah in general had started going to hospitals in the era I was born with less-than-wondrous results. I’d read all the books, talked all the talk. It was a set-myself-apart, make-a-statement burning desire that I experience natural childbirth. We were living on a remote ranch so I checked into a motel across the street from a small hospital in a tiny town once I began labor. Why? I’d just participated in a birth on that same ranch in which the woman tore horribly. We had to load her and her new baby in the back of a cold jeep with worn-out shock absorbers and drive three hours on dirt roads in winter weather to get her to someone who could sew her up and then three hours back again. After I’d checked into the hotel with a defiant notion of how it was all going to turn out for me, it was one thing after another. First, I started itching all over. Our room was infested with fleas and I had to get settled into another room and rid myself of fleas. Then my labor went on and on and on. I walked across the street to the hospital and they gave me a sedative (I desperately needed some rest) that made me vomit--I fell and hit my head on the way to the toilet. They checked me in but remember, in this particular situation, we were without modern monitors, etc. I stalled at 8 cm dilation because my daughter's head was in the wrong position and wasn’t helping dilate me (we didn’t know it until we saw her misshapen head after). Even after 72 hours of labor, not only was my precious daughter stuck but I was stuck in my thinking. Finally, a doctor put one hand on my shaking knee in the air and his other hand on my hand said, "MaryJane, this is about having a healthy baby." In that instant, when he gave me permission to let go of my notion of right and wrong, they put a healthy (but stressed) baby girl in my arms within minutes, C-section. It cost a total of $900 so later that month I sold a 14’ travel trailer I’d been living in to pay for it.

Here's another way to think about "grain." In the link below there is a graph at the bottom that lists cereal grasses and their seed heads.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fonio

If you were a cow in the wild and you came upon a field of grass that had gone to seed, you’d think you’d died and gone to heaven. There's no way you'd try to eat just the grass and ignore the seed heads. In fact, you’d probably gobble up the high-energy, yummy seed heads first. When I put a fresh bale of straw out for my girls, they spend about an hour nosing around and sniffing out the few kernels of wheat that sometimes end up in the straw. If I were marketing my operation as grass-fed would I have to lie about that? I had a woman call me to ask, first, if I had A2 cows, I said, yes. She then asked about antibiotics and I explained to her that in order to save a cow (or a child) I’ve always been grateful for antibiotics (again, this stems from the fact that in the mega-dairy world, cows are fed antibiotics in their feed every day), and then she asked whether or not a single kernel of grain had ever in the cow’s life passed its lips. When I said yes, I feed them grain daily, she hung up on me.

I would say that as I age, my world as I see it, gets more and more gray. I feel bad for the producers I've talked to recently who are in a serious marketing tight spot over grass vs. grain. Either they’re dealing with drought and lack of “grass” or they have a producing milk cow(s) that is slowly losing body mass; the photos I've seen are alarming. If grass-only is keeping your cows and bulls vital, stick with it. If not, give yourself permission to recognize that it’s about having healthy cows, not single-issue marketing slogans.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~

NellieBelle

10929 Posts


Posted - Nov 23 2015 :  09:39:59 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Your personal experience sounds much like mine. Other than I only hung in (labor) for 24 hours, then the C-section. I remember the doctor saying to me, "what do you think about having your baby at home now?" In which case I told him to "keep still", in not so polite words. :) I was grateful for a beautiful boy. It all goes back to what our doctors said and what's really important. The health of the baby, the health of the cow. The best outcome. What's important. It's easy to get a mindset and miss the most important thing. Making the right choices has to be the hardest things in life. Must be where the learning curve comes in. Life lessons.

To laugh is human but to moo is bovine. Author Unknown
Go to Top of Page

txbikergirl

3191 Posts


Posted - Nov 23 2015 :  5:48:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
thanks for this. it speaks to me along the lines of being reasonable, and the health of the cow. we are actually focusing on less processed/prepared feeds and more natural/normal presentation - as opposed to only this or only that.

its like the term "organic". If you eat ALL "organic" are you healthier? Well what if it is comprised entirely of 100% organic mac and cheese, organic pancakes and syrup, organic sweet cereal... all that is labeled organic, but what about adding in the fresh greens, fresh fruits, etc. everyone looks at labels now, but doesn't really think about big picture common sense. if it is all organic, but not well rounded, then it isn't healthy.

we are really trying to balance common sense and back to basics, as natural as possible, and not get all caught up into the whims of current society ... its about focusing on the health of the cow.


Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
Go to Top of Page

Caren

166 Posts


Posted - Nov 24 2015 :  10:02:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Mary Jane, I totally agree with your common sense approach to ascertaining a good feeding program for our dairy cows. Our cows have been healthy with great body on grass, hay, and alfalfa pellets the last three years. But this summer we had a very long stretch without rain and are going into winter with scarce cool weather grasses therefore, we ordered a ton of organic dairy ration to feed this winter. I do appreciate MaryJane's guidance concerning this subject (she gave me great advice). In my circle, adherence to grass-feeding is the order of the day. So there is quite a bit of social pressure and most of my fellow cow-girls I met through HMI (Holistic Management International).

Nonetheless, we are feeding an organic dairy ration from Coyote Creek grain mill in a Texas. Jacey, our family milk cow has rich yellow cream that is delectable. The recommended ration is up to 4% of body weight. That sure seems like a lot, I have been feeding 2 gallons daily. We have still have green growing so she stays out grazing all day and eats hay at night.

I have a questions about Nickel and Rainey, both due with babies around April 1st. They both are very fleshy and I am not sure how much or if I should feed them grain at all. They might be too heavy, but they maintain body condition on sparse and dry vegetation. I want to make sure they have all the vitamins and minerals needed and this dairy ration is a complete feed. They are easy keepers just like their sire, but I want all of our bases covered concerning nutrition.

Next week I am having a consultant evaluate body condition and access the health of our girls. She is teaching me how to test fecal samples for parasites. I am looking forward to a learning experience. She looks at many factors: stressors, herd dynamics, hygiene, feed and water, handling.

Another issue of concern. Am I the only one with a cow that will only eat the finest or nothing? Jacey has a very large hay bin all for herself and picks through every little straw and only eats about one fourth. If she can't have the hay she wants then she chooses to go without. The hay is very nice hay and the others are grateful and gobble it up. She lost weight this summer during extreme heat because she wouldn't eat what we gave her. This can be very frustrating when trying to keep weight on her. I think she is a bit spoiled but what can we do. ;). When our new beautiful organic dairy ration was delivered she snubbed it for about a week, then finally with molasses coating she tried it. She has the run of the pasture to herself so their is no competition. Jacey loves being an only cow in the milking parlor. Most cows want a buddy but not her.
Go to Top of Page

maryjane

6764 Posts


Posted - Nov 25 2015 :  06:06:01 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow, Caren, I checked out Coyote Creek Grains. It never ceases to amaze me how difficult it is to keep good business people down. They continue to sprout up everywhere. I love their philosophy.

4% does seem like a fair amount. I feed my producing cows several "scoops" while they are being milked but for the most part, my cows get Chaffhaye as well as straight timothy and some pasture at various times throughout the spring/summer/fall. I feed my bulls a good size scoop every day also and they get Chaffhaye and Timothy also. They do have access to pasture all summer. I like the moist Chaffhaye because it's easy for me to make sure everyone gets their daily minerals. I've never experienced body mass issues (Miss Daisy could be a problem if I weren't watchful) but I did have issues with milk production with my cow Maizy (deceased). That's when I let go of any remaining grass vs. grain notions I had because I saw how greatly it improved not only her milk production but the flavor of her milk, plus she was more content afterward. My bulls get downright cranky without a grain treat every day. They look forward to it. It's like their morning cup of coffee. Now I think grasses and their seed heads--no more versus, either/or for me.

Regarding Nickel and Rainey, I am very careful with grains when my girls are pregnant, especially in the last few months. It sounds like what you're doing is perfect for them. I concentrate on minerals and calcium (up until 2 weeks prior to their due dates when I quit giving them alfalfa and dairy minerals high in calcium--they do have access to Redmond rock salt and kelp at all times).

I'm jealous that you have someone who can come to help you determine body condition, etc. (the etcetera part is a fantastic line up). I look forward to hearing what you learn. I do test stool samples. I've had trouble with mites in the spring but never anyone with an overgrowth of intestinal parasites.

Regarding Jacey, I had to smile. Isn't it amazing how different all their personalities are? Some crave companionship and others can take or leave it. I wonder if her food pickiness stems from lack of competition at the feed bin? The only thing I've experienced along those lines is Miss Daisy who loves Chaffhaye in the morning but walks away from it in the evening. Consequently, she gets her own portion of Timothy in the evening that she gobbles up. I wonder if you could try a different hay just to see? Cindy said that when Sally was given the choice between Timothy and something else, she completely abandoned the Timothy. Sometimes I think they're trying to tell us something. What that is requires a detective's hat for sure. Trial and error.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
Go to Top of Page

maryjane

6764 Posts


Posted - Nov 25 2015 :  07:25:16 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I should add that I find a grain concentrate almost essential when I'm weaning or getting ready to wean a calf and then throughout the months that follow. It satisfies them more. It's hard for them to go from milk to hay. The concentrate works well for a calf. With a calf I become a serious poo inspector in order to determine the health of their developing rumen. I also do stool samples on my youngsters to make sure I'm on top of parasite issues.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
Go to Top of Page

txbikergirl

3191 Posts


Posted - Nov 25 2015 :  11:45:10 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Caren, we are feeding coyote creek as well. i started using their organic alfalfa pellets when the cows came home, and just last week put in my first order of the "soy free dairy heifer" ration - is that what you are feeding? they have another corn/soy ration but we liked the mix in this one, and the fact that so much of it is still in natural form instead of all processed. we are actually going to use that as our "treat/supplement" as we are also on pasture almost year round and have a neighbor supplying our hay.

as we only have one cow and one calf we have been using bags up until now, but talking to adam at coyote creek last week he said a can (approx 300#) would last 4 months (before spoiling) so we may move to that; more economical and then we can pick it up straight from the mill instead of going through a feed store middleman.

we also feed chaffhaye, LOVE that stuff. mary jane introduced us to it and a little goes a long way. we feed it to our cow and calf, and both love it. its mostly light and fluffy, and like mary jane said it helps mix up the minerals so the cows get those down without question.

miss sally is picky at times, and she is also more of a loner as mary jane can attest. some days she clears out everything by eating, other days (like this morning) she just tossed the hay around and made a mess. but then she does go back and eats some of it so go figure. i honestly have more of a problem with her in the milking parlor as she wants only her alfalfa pellets and wants to push any chaffhaye or minerals to the side, but i just put it all on a bed of dry hay and refuse to add anything more until she eats it all so she eventually does. its a game for us, like a kid in a highchair. i am the newbie here and still learning. she knows that and puts me to the test.

i enjoy hearing what you are doing since you are in a similar local as environment and pasture access makes the big difference in the diet.

Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
Go to Top of Page

Caren

166 Posts


Posted - Nov 25 2015 :  6:44:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Today we picked up two heifers Cupcake and Chocolate from their mothers and brought them home for weaning. Cupcake is a Bruno daughter with a three quarters Jersey dam, other cross is black Angus. Chocolate is a Bolt daughter (Bolt is a full Jersey bull from a registered dam and AI sire) and a black Angus dam. We are trying many crosses to see what works in our geographic location. I try to match a pair of sisters to be reared together to foster a close bond. These two heifers have been out pasturing with their moms and so today was the day we brought them home together to wean. They both were born April 2015. Tonight they are separated by a fence but can touch noses. Cupcake was born here at our house and was halter broken before taken out to graze in a remote location. She must remember because she is very calm all things considered.
We will keep them separated until sucking urge subsides. Should I feed them grain tomorrow or get them started on hay?

Our dairy ration is soy-free and GMO free. Yes, Adam is great and is very helpful. We had our feed delivered, I thought it was very inexpensive. Coyote Creek runs lab work to verify GMO free which is important to us. We are feeding a ground meal, not the pellets. Are you ordering meal or pellets? We used their alfalfa pellets for years. I put a quarter cup of organic apple cider vinegar in their ration and add others supplements depending on individual's needs. I have been using Ester-C, dried herbs (we have a herb garden of garlic, sage, rosemary, tarragon, oregano, and buy mustard seeds), probios, and mastoblast if CMT is not perfect. I haven't bought kelp but the dairy ration is suppose to have it. Our hay is brown rib sorghum, hay grazer, and red top cane. It is fertilized but no herbicides. We have to use clean hay because we fertilize our garden with manure. We live in the grass burr capital so untreated hay is very difficult to find.

I haven't tried chaffhaye but hope to locate some soon, sounds like the cows would benefit from it. I need options for Jacey. :). She is ten years old and has me figured out. I love miking older cows, so peaceful. We just call her or wave if she is out in the pasture and she comes in twice daily to milk. We are hand-milking right now and I am enjoying the quiet time. Kinda like exercise class only the reward is beautiful milk and happiness.

It was very warm here today in Mason, TX.
Go to Top of Page

Caren

166 Posts


Posted - Nov 25 2015 :  7:17:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

How lucky am I? Chaffhaye is right here in Texas and GMO free. There is a dealer within 25 miles and I am going to buy some just as soon as I can get there.
Many thanks!
Go to Top of Page

NellieBelle

10929 Posts


Posted - Nov 26 2015 :  02:38:04 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Congratulations on your newly acquired heifers Caren. Sounds like everything is falling into place nicely there. Hope you share photos of your gals sometime. Love to see them.

To laugh is human but to moo is bovine. Author Unknown
Go to Top of Page

maryjane

6764 Posts


Posted - Nov 26 2015 :  05:20:53 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Cupcake and Chocolate! My second milk cow was named Chocolate. I wean my calves slowly starting at around 2 months by giving them time away from their mothers. My the time their rumen is fully developed at 4 months, I have them eating timothy hay, Chaffhaye, and grain along with only one or two sessions with their mothers and then I wean them around 5 or 6 months. I make sure they're never without free-choice food and water. I'm not sure if that's helpful in your situation but I'm thinking since yours are older and have been on pasture for so long, they'd love to taste some grain to help replace the high-energy milk they'll be missing. I would start out with very small amounts until they're used to it. Watch their stools for clues as to how it's all working. I have a bottle-raised heifer (milk in a bottle until she was 5 months old) that was born in April and she loves nibbling on her food on and off all day long. She gobbles up the Chaffhaye (with minerals) and grain and looks fantastic. I like your idea of adding the ACV directly to the pellets. I will have to try that.

Isn't this the second time you've raised two sisters together? Very sweet.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
Go to Top of Page

maryjane

6764 Posts


Posted - Nov 26 2015 :  05:26:04 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just ordered some Mastoblast. I'd never heard of it!

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
Go to Top of Page

txbikergirl

3191 Posts


Posted - Nov 26 2015 :  3:58:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
just ordered some Mastoblast. new to me as well. always want to be prepared for when the human screws something up to make the cow sick ;>

Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
Go to Top of Page

CloversMum

3473 Posts


Posted - Nov 27 2015 :  1:08:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
So appreciate new information and sources shared on this chat room. Off to check out Coyote Creek and Mastoblast.

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; 1 Jersey cow; 1 Guernsey cow; 1 Guernsey steer calf; Oberhasli & Guernsey goats, ducks and chickens
Go to Top of Page

Caren

166 Posts


Posted - Nov 27 2015 :  8:47:11 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

The book "Homeopathy for the Herd" by C. Edgar Sheaffer, V.M.D. is where I learned about Mastoblast.

Go to Top of Page

NellieBelle

10929 Posts


Posted - Nov 28 2015 :  03:22:07 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
All the information posted by all is so valuable and I'm so thankful we can come here to draw from the well. I recall Mike mentioning that book some time back, so must have some good information in it. I will look into that one for my library. Thanks so much Caren.

To laugh is human but to moo is bovine. Author Unknown
Go to Top of Page

maryjane

6764 Posts


Posted - Dec 02 2015 :  11:41:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Caren,
The instructions on the Mastoblast call for X amount 2x/day for several days. I assume that would be if a cow actually had mastitis and not merely gelling a cup (thankfully, none of my cows have been gelling cups lately). Any recommendation for a dose or doses when there's only a slight gel happening?

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
Go to Top of Page

Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Dec 03 2015 :  05:12:32 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Might want to mention about the chaff hay ...had a talk with the people who answered the phone and they can't certify that the product is GMO free. As we know GMO alfalfa was past as OK by the FDA a few years back for production...just the fir what it's worth....I don't know what's in it one way or the other

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
Go to Top of Page

maryjane

6764 Posts


Posted - Dec 03 2015 :  06:22:44 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good morning Ron. Can I have the name please of who you spoke with and I'll get to the bottom of it? Thanks!!

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
Go to Top of Page

CloversMum

3473 Posts


Posted - Dec 03 2015 :  08:38:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
For what it is worth, several months ago (June 2015) I emailed Kimber Leigh Davies, Sales & Marketing with Chaffhaye, with several questions regarding Chaffhaye and in our discussion she lists Chaffhaye as being GMO free.

Here's what she wrote:
Our recommended feeding ratio is 1.5 lbs. of Chaffhaye per 100 lbs. of horse & 2 to 2.5 lbs. per 100 lbs. of ruminant per day when feeding Chaffhaye as the sole forage portion of your animals’ diet.

Additionally, when feeding Chaffhaye, you will be able to cut all of your secondary feed in half (grains, hay, etc…). This is due to Chaffhaye being a fermented hay, 50% predigested, and creating an environment for the other feeds that are sharing space in the stomach of the animal benefit from the micro flora that Chaffhaye adds and therefore breaking down the secondary feeds for a better absorption rate.

More about Chaffhaye:
What makes us different than traditional baled alfalfa? The major difference between Chaffhaye and baled alfalfa is that Chaffhaye undergoes a fermentation process which breaks down the plant matter. The fermentation in a way “pre-digests” the plant matter so when the animals eat Chaffhaye they are getting about 50% more nutrition then they would out of a dry, baled forage.

The unique biological aspects of Chaffhaye Alfalfa exert health and physiological benefits beyond the basic nutrition of the forage itself. Chaffhaye undergoes an all-natural fermentation process in the package that enlivens it with yeast, enzymes and beneficial microflora. Chaffhaye’s beneficial microflora, or fiber-digesting bacteria, closely resembles those found in the early fiber-digestion process in the rumen of ruminants, or in the case of the horse, the fermenter located in their hind gut. In essence, Chaffhaye jump starts the digestive process. Once Chaffhaye is consumed, more of its nutrients can be assimilated (absorbed) in the body, leading to greater nutritional benefit - strong bones.

Research has shown that dry matters losses on baled alfalfa run 15% to 25%. These are losses that occur from handling, storage and feeding. With Chaffhaye there is very little dry matter loss. When considering less waste and more absorption, we believe a bag of Chaffhaye is equal to about 1.5 bales of alfalfa (assuming a 60 lb. bale).

Chaffhaye has a number of benefits that are harder to put a cost on. We call these benefits, the Chaffhaye Advantage:

• Consistent quality because we grow and maintain our own alfalfa fields

• 16 month shelf life with a guaranty of no nutritional loss

• Animals consume 100%, no stems left behind

• Tender and more palatable than baled alfalfa

• Optimal health through enhanced nutrition

• Natural probiotic forage

• Easy to transport

• Can be stored outside without fear of weather damage

• Dust free

• Certified weed seed free

• 50% less manure produced by a Chaffhaye fed animals

• Not a fire hazard

• Great for establishing and maintaining a healthy micro flora in the gut

• Excellent for weaning animals

• Excellent roughage source – provides the vital “Scratch Factor” necessary for stimulation to gut wall to insure for a higher absorption rate of nutrients

• Easily masticated and digested

• Fermentation produces beneficial bacteria, enzymes and yeast that aid in digestion

• GMO free

• Low starch & sugar

Recent studies have shown that the digestibility of feed is as important as its nutritional content. Through a natural fermentation process, Chaffhaye becomes rich in beneficial microflora. This microflora makes Chaffhaye one of the most digestible and therefore nutritious products available for your animals.

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; 1 Jersey cow; 1 Guernsey cow; 1 Guernsey steer calf; Oberhasli & Guernsey goats, ducks and chickens
Go to Top of Page

Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Dec 03 2015 :  08:55:33 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Mary Jane. I really don't remember who I spoke to when I called. It was a while back when the discussion started about the product. I was trying to determine if the products were not sprayed with any synthetics and had the chance of being GMO. At that time I was told the could not certify one way or the other on GMO or spray or organic. They mentioned there were no third party certifications on it concerning the product.

Sure didn't mean to stir anything up but being it was mentioned about some one being concerned about GMO I thought I would pass on my conversation...I guess I should be more attentive to names and so on but with us it was more an inquiry to see if we thought it would work in our application ...just when we figure something don't interest us I kind of don't put more thought into it. Yes MJ it would be good maybe if you asked a few more questions? Can they certify non GMO? I dunno...

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
Go to Top of Page

Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Dec 03 2015 :  08:59:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mary Jane. Found one email I did receive from the company ( can't believe I had it ) it's for your information. It did say the are non GMO but I couldn't get a certification of it....I forwarded the mail I received to you...

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
Go to Top of Page

maryjane

6764 Posts


Posted - Dec 03 2015 :  09:17:44 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm not worried about non-certified with a company like Chaffhaye. They own their own fields, they're here in Idaho, and are just avoiding all the bureaucratic hassle and expense of the ten different certifications one needs these days to keep people happy. We get asked about things like Kosher, Cruelty-free and non-GMO certification more than we'd like and we patiently explain that it's cost prohibitive and time-consuming to be attentive to that much paperwork. As it is, my organic certification (given the amount of volume we sell in our dried foods) is a huge amount of work--every single speck of inventory tracked, numbered, justified--paper trail of everyone else's certifications--and then an inspector who captures Brian and Nick for two full days 1x/year and then a huge check written out every year based on volume.

Like I've always said, we should take back our language. When I grow an ORGANIC carrot I want to call it a CARROT, period. Let the chemical companies do back-flips documenting all the different chemicals, etc. in an effort to prove to people what they use and when and then all of it tracked and fees paid for every speck of chemical to prove that it's a CHEMICAL carrot while mine is simply a CARROT.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
Go to Top of Page

maryjane

6764 Posts


Posted - Dec 03 2015 :  09:26:34 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ron, I just read the email you sent me that they sent you. They said they were certified non-GMO but not certified organic.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
Go to Top of Page

Caren

166 Posts


Posted - Dec 03 2015 :  1:40:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I am picking up chaffhaye tomorrow, so excited to see if it will help my girls.
Go to Top of Page

Caren

166 Posts


Posted - Dec 03 2015 :  2:34:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Use of mastoblast; I give a capful once daily if the slightest thickening occurs on the CMT. I stop use when all samples show no reaction. If there is gelling I have been giving 2x/daily.

Example: Jacey has had perfect CMT and last night out of nowhere a bit of thickening, we added a capful of Mastoblast and by this morning close to perfect.

The consultant came today and said to make sure and not give peppermint because it will anecdote the Mastoblast. There are other things that will make this happen as well, I need to research this topic further.

We will learn to test for parasites using the microscope next time. She wanted to take a look at all the girls, their environment , how I relate to each, and potential stressors. I really like that she looks at the whole cow and is helping me form a plan to enhance immunity and vibrant health, so when undesirables are near they pass our girls without causing illness. Seems to all go back to vibrant health. I try really hard to constantly work on my family's immune system and gut health, and it seems to have had a tremendous impact. But for the girls I really need to further educate myself, hopefully I am off to a good start. One thing the consultant said today (and we just heard this from Mary Jane) which I think is profound is how important it is to use your own tuition about your animals. After all we do know them best! The consultant said it is very important not to bring fear to our animals. She believes it affects their healing and health. Just focus on truths not "what if" and not let fear make decisions for you. I am terrible in this area. ;(. I can get very upset very fast if something is not right with my girls and have been known to become irrational. Yikes! But as Mary Jane said as well, it is very important to make sure that we feel a peace about our methods.
Sometimes we will be alone in our plight.
The consultant loves Chaffhaye and believes it will be another important tool in the toolbox.
I'll share more later. We are going to use mineral selection of the cows along with soil testing to help see how we can work on soil health. Very exciting
Go to Top of Page
Page: of 3 Topic  
Next Page
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To: