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maryjane

7053 Posts


Posted - Nov 10 2014 :  4:57:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's the installation info and my invoice for purchasing three BarBarA waterers. Sure do love them! No electricity needed and they're self-cleaning. See installation instructions here:
https://www.heritagejersey.org/images/chatroom/livestock-feeder.pdf
And here's their website and phone #:
http://www.HorseDrinker.com
800-451-2230


MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~

Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 10 2014 :  5:12:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Be qurious to see how they work with cattle. Have you used this yet in winter or is this the first year?

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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maryjane

7053 Posts


Posted - Nov 10 2014 :  5:15:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, I've had one installed for four years now. This will be its 5th winter. Never any problems whatsoever. I have a total of six now. My cows love them.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 10 2014 :  5:48:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Put it on my list. Right after the backhoe! :)

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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NellieBelle

11194 Posts


Posted - Nov 10 2014 :  6:15:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you so much MaryJane. It just seems like a no brainer. I talked to Joe a bit before he left for his meeting and he sounds favorable. So will just depend if we can get a back hoe in here before things get too cold. Thanks for the installation info. Appreciate you looking this all up.
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Nov 11 2014 :  10:08:02 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, most definitely on my list too. And thank you, MaryJane, for posting the installation information.

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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maryjane

7053 Posts


Posted - Nov 11 2014 :  10:20:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thought some of our construction/installation photos from earlier this summer might come in handy if you're thinking about a BarBarA.

Here's what our pastoral farm looked like all summer!



And here's what a BarBarA pit looks like.







After they're installed and turned on and the dirt around them sufficiently tamped down, I mound lots of wood chips around each one for mud control. If you put them at 18 inches high, the younger calves will eventually figure out how to use them also. In the beginning, the little tykes go over and sneak a drink while momma is drinking. I'd say overall, they let Momma do the drinking for the two and them and they nurse instead. I used to worry about the very young calves getting enough water but after setting out their own water, I've figured out they get what they need soon enough.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 11 2014 :  10:23:14 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice job Nick? Don't look like you guys bury much over four feet up there ?

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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maryjane

7053 Posts


Posted - Nov 11 2014 :  10:27:21 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Our recommended depth for water lines is 36 inches but we go down 48 whenever possible. I should also point out that we've since built a wooden post and rail structure around the frost-free hydrants you see in the above photos. The animals rub on them, get their halters caught on them, etc. so we always enclose a hydrant if there are animals around.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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NellieBelle

11194 Posts


Posted - Nov 11 2014 :  10:37:12 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you MaryJane for the pictures. Looks like a guy could put a Bar-Bar A just about everyplace there is a hydrant. I put two in the vineyard but we let the cows in where the hydrants are. I went out one day and found the hydrant running. One of the cows must have rubbed up against it turning it on, so I wired the handle down.
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 11 2014 :  11:31:27 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes we always put in four inch pipe filled with concrete here in a triangle shape around the hydrants. All water lines six foot minimum.

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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farmlife

1413 Posts


Posted - Nov 11 2014 :  4:57:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the information MaryJane. We need to run a hydrant out to our livestock area next summer. If we are going to be doing it anyway it looks like a good time to do a Bar Bar A waterer as well. That would save a lot of time and energy filling tanks and keeping them clean, thawed etc.

I saw in the installation instructions that the line can plug off if there's dirt in it. Have you ever had any trouble with hard water causing a problem? Our water has a lot of minerals in it.
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maryjane

7053 Posts


Posted - Nov 11 2014 :  5:05:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We have hard water also but haven't had that problem. Hmmm.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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maryjane

7053 Posts


Posted - Nov 13 2014 :  09:56:23 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's how we protect our hydrant from the cows.




MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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NellieBelle

11194 Posts


Posted - Nov 13 2014 :  10:07:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good idea. Certainly keep them from turning on hydrant or getting caught. That will have to go on the Spring to do list I'm thinking.
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 13 2014 :  12:30:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
First class. Very cleanly done!

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Nov 14 2014 :  5:07:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I definitely agree with Ron!

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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NellieBelle

11194 Posts


Posted - Nov 18 2014 :  07:23:16 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
MaryJane did you buy the aluminum protective guard that goes on top or the Bar Bar A waterer? I did some reading and this should work. Our frostline in IA is 42" and this waterer is said to work with 18"-5 ft. frostline. You get severely cold weather in Idaho too so I don't see any reason for it not to work here.

To laugh is human but to moo is bovine. Author Unknown
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maryjane

7053 Posts


Posted - Nov 18 2014 :  08:43:29 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I didn't buy the aluminum guard. I've never had any of my animals bother the top at all. I suppose it could be added after the fact.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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NellieBelle

11194 Posts


Posted - Nov 18 2014 :  09:10:16 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you. Yes, I could wait and see if any of them bother it and then order one. Going to place my order today. I will at least have it here then and we can get whatever we need and get it in the ground when the weather and ground are conducive for digging.
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NellieBelle

11194 Posts


Posted - Nov 18 2014 :  10:43:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Have the Bar Bar A ordered. At least 10 days out so it will all depend on the weather once it arrives and the availability of equipment for digging etc. It we can't get it in right away at least it will be here and we can have everything ready to go. I'm anxious to have it in and working. "Oh what a relief it will be!"
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 18 2014 :  12:33:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Show off. :)

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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NellieBelle

11194 Posts


Posted - Nov 18 2014 :  12:46:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Say that once it's in the ground. :)
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 18 2014 :  1:59:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Lol..yeah, that is my challenge here. Getting any dirt work done. Not to mention water lines here gotta go six foot.

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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farmlife

1413 Posts


Posted - Nov 19 2014 :  04:54:07 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
After this last week of nasty weather this is definitely on my wish list for summer!
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NellieBelle

11194 Posts


Posted - Nov 19 2014 :  06:38:14 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's what I figured here. No more carrying and emptying hoses of water, no more carrying 5 gal. buckets to fill livestock tanks, no more chopping ice. You all know what I'm talking about. So for me once again, MaryJane has turned a light on so we can all work smarter and the cows benefit. A win, win, once again!
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