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 CPR resuscitation on calf
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NellieBelle

11033 Posts


Posted - Nov 20 2015 :  4:43:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was just curious and wondered if anyone has performed CPR on a calf? I've been doing some research and have come across some interesting reading. There are also products that stimulate respirations after birth that I was not aware. With time of the essence when something is going wrong, I was wanting to learn more about this. Any experience with this?

To laugh is human but to moo is bovine. Author Unknown

maryjane

6890 Posts


Posted - Nov 20 2015 :  6:27:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I should bone up on that if you have any links you'd like to share, Janet. I was able to get a seal while breathing rhythmically into Starletta's lungs but we were too late. Nick also tried pumping her chest and then I tried lifting her entire body in the air. We just couldn't get her out in time. While a calf is still inside they're getting oxygen from the umbilical cord. Once its head starts out or comes out, the cord starts to pinch off and there isn't room for the lungs to expand and fill with air until the entire body is out. Speed is everything. What needed to have been done in Eliza Belle's case and could have easily been done by someone who has training is to push the head and one foreleg back while the retained leg is flexed and brought into position. Having never done a vaginal exam before on a cow, and an objecting, kicking cow at that, I thought I felt hooves and a nose. As it turns out, I only felt one hoof. It never crossed my mind that one leg might be back. I was thinking that I was supposed to be feeling for a back or butt, something breach. I still can't believe I let the Vet on duty at WSU tell me not to bring her over and do an exam instead when her contractions were still plenty far apart, 15 to 20 minutes. I could have had her there in two contractions. What's the worse that could happen? I'd bring a cow over and she'd had a normal delivery and I'd be ashamed? Not a chance. I'm a better safe than sorry person. I even put my purse in the truck. I mean why all the hoopla then? The 4 year degrees, the countless hours of practicum, the residencies, the huge hospital, the lofty titles, etc. if I'm supposed to know what they know. Poor Eliza Belle. Our job is to help her and we let her down.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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NellieBelle

11033 Posts


Posted - Nov 20 2015 :  7:43:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I know I would have been in a desperate state if something like that were to happen here. And I have no way of getting my cows to a vet. My vet is 35-40 miles away, so there is no way I could get them anywhere in time, so I was curious to know if anyone had had success with CPR. I hope it never happens, and I wouldn't know what I was feeling for if I were to reach into a cow. I'm not even sure students or professionals would know for sure. You did what you could MaryJane. We are only human and like you said, not vets. I would like to familiarize myself with the different positions and information on what to do in such cases but it's doubtful I would be successful. And like you, I would try to do something to try and get the little thing to breath. Just hard the way things turn out. Hard to deal with. I will post some of the links I came across. You are probably familiar with most of the information but I wasn't. You didn't let Eliza Belle down MaryJane. I'd say the vet did. I almost lost Nellie's first calf because when I called the vets, they wouldn't come. 2:30 in the morning and they said, "you are probably doing all that can be done." Sounds pure lazy to me. So I feel like I need to try and learn some of this stuff, not that I will make a difference if something should go wrong. I hate the helpless feeling.

To laugh is human but to moo is bovine. Author Unknown
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NellieBelle

11033 Posts


Posted - Nov 20 2015 :  7:58:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I notice in one of my reference books, Essential Guide to Calving they have a few of the birth mal-presentations and suggestions of how to reposition. Also a bit on CPR and how to get a calf to breath. I guess I will try to study up and get it in my head. But just because it's in there doesn't mean I'd be successful. Doubtful.http://www.richardbealblog.com/calves-that-don’t-breathe-at-birth/

To laugh is human but to moo is bovine. Author Unknown

Edited by - NellieBelle on Nov 21 2015 07:49:00 AM
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NellieBelle

11033 Posts


Posted - Nov 21 2015 :  03:40:30 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I keep trying to get the links/web addresses down but they never work. Sorry. I'll keep trying. I may have to send them to you MaryJane, as everything I try doesn't work. Frustrating.

To laugh is human but to moo is bovine. Author Unknown

Edited by - NellieBelle on Nov 21 2015 03:49:36 AM
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NellieBelle

11033 Posts


Posted - Nov 21 2015 :  03:52:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
http://desk.jkanimalhusbandry.net/customer/en/portal/articles/535467-reviving-a-newborn-calf

To laugh is human but to moo is bovine. Author Unknown

Edited by - NellieBelle on Nov 21 2015 07:40:42 AM
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 21 2015 :  04:27:30 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mary Jane you didn't let the animals down at all...you dove in there like you said with no practical training in that procedure and you and Nick put your soul in it...this was just one of them bad situations where you learned , hopefully a vet on duty learned something but a calf gave its life...I'm kinda thinking this will never happen again with the new gained experience...I've been there with animals and watch them die as I cried due to my lack of experience in one thing or another and it ain't fun and I'll carry each ones imprint in my heart and mind...chances are I /we know better now....hard to tell how many countless ones we will save in the future or how many we will teach....one calf died so many might live ? You did more than most could/ would have. ( hug ) good job Cowgirl.

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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NellieBelle

11033 Posts


Posted - Nov 21 2015 :  07:10:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
http://www.progressivedairy.com/topics/calves-heifers/five-tips-for-newborn-calf-resuscitation I will try to add the others thanks to MaryJane's instructions. :)

To laugh is human but to moo is bovine. Author Unknown
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NellieBelle

11033 Posts


Posted - Nov 21 2015 :  07:23:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
http://blog.storey.com/2013/03/heather-smith-thomas-notes-from-sky_739.html http://blog.storey.com/2013/03/heather-smith-thomas-notes-from-sky_19.html

To laugh is human but to moo is bovine. Author Unknown

Edited by - NellieBelle on Nov 21 2015 07:25:59 AM
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txbikergirl

3197 Posts


Posted - Nov 21 2015 :  4:18:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
mary jane, do NOT think you let her down. think of all the treks to the vet and stays of pregnant cows because you were doing everything "right"... and you have laughed at yourself often for being too overcautious when those cows delivered fine without human intervention. it is just an awful situation and some things in life just suck. you are an amazing cow momma, and an incredible inspiration to us all. you are trying to take the world on your shoulders here, and you neednt do that.

i'll end with that sometimes life sucks, and life surely isn't fair. but you didn't let anyone down.

Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
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