Chatroom

[flourish]
 All Forums
 Cow Community and Chit Chat
 Zoning Codes
 Local Codes
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Author Topic  

Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Sep 09 2014 :  6:13:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well we did sacrifice to get to a place where there are no codes at all. Goods and services are far and few between most of the time when you choose to live this far out. Has goods and bads about it.
Glad to always answer any questions if anyone is ever planning this type of move.

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.

maryjane

6626 Posts


Posted - Sep 10 2014 :  06:09:10 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ron, Are you referring to building codes? No building codes?

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
Go to Top of Page

Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Sep 10 2014 :  06:19:46 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
No building codes here,no local rules or ordinances. We live about 180 miles north of Rapid City SD and about 175 miles south of Bismarck ND. The farm is on the outer edge of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe reservation. Had an electrician out here a while back and I asked about a permit and inspection by the State. She laughed at me and I was informed the a State has not authority. Go figure. No building permits, no restrictions, basically little to no law enforcement.
We actually started our own police department here for safety. We now have Beau the LGD who we have made Chief of police of a Glad Valley. He works for bones. :)

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
Go to Top of Page

Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Sep 10 2014 :  07:33:06 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Picture of the chief of police here at Glad Valley.

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
Go to Top of Page

CloversMum

3468 Posts


Posted - Sep 10 2014 :  2:48:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Beau doesn't look too fierce as a Police Chief! Looks like he could be bribed with tasty treats...

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; 1 Jersey cow; 1 Jersey heifer; 1 Guernsey cow; Oberhasli & Guernsey goats, ducks and chickens

Edited by - CloversMum on Sep 11 2014 4:10:35 PM
Go to Top of Page

Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Sep 10 2014 :  2:57:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nothing mean on this place. And yes, all the male things on this place can be bribed with tasty treats! :)

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
Go to Top of Page

CloversMum

3468 Posts


Posted - Sep 11 2014 :  4:12:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What sort of training did you do with your LGD? We are starting to think a livestock guardian dog might be a good thing on our mini farm.

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; 1 Jersey cow; 1 Jersey heifer; 1 Guernsey cow; Oberhasli & Guernsey goats, ducks and chickens
Go to Top of Page

Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Sep 11 2014 :  7:28:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just much positive reinforcement and plenty of love. Took about 3 years for the dog to totally respect me enough to mind the way I need/want. He was bred as a range dog to live out on the range with sheep and keep coyotes and wolves at bay.
I turned him into more of a farm dog which just took time,love and positive reinforcement. His breed (Anatolian) is very intuitive but strong willed. Great with sheep and goats. When we ran sheep He would stick to them like glue and when the predators came around He made short work of them.
I would say if I had it to do again I might consider a female dog and maybe a different breed if I knew it was a farm only dog. Most good LGD breeders can and will assist you with training and information. A great multi purpose LGD would be a Pyrenees.

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
Go to Top of Page

CloversMum

3468 Posts


Posted - Oct 27 2014 :  7:33:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
So, are Pyrenees less strong willed than the Anatolians? I would very much like to get a dog that would protect the goats, chickens, and cow while able to stick around on our 28 acres...it is not all yet fenced. Our black lab/border collie is a doll, but not much of a watch dog. She walks through the chicken yard without a thought of harming the chickens and gets along fine with the goats and cow...she still gets confused with the goats want to butt heads with her. :-)

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; 1 Jersey cow; 1 Jersey heifer; 1 Guernsey cow; Oberhasli & Guernsey goats, ducks and chickens
Go to Top of Page

Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Oct 27 2014 :  7:48:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have found that the Anatolian is a very strong willed dog. They aim to please but require much hands on working with for the first couple years . The males seem to be the most aggressive as far as predator control but the females easier to dominate. There are still times when Beau needs to be reminded who runs the place. Nothing comes or goes here without Him checking it out. Great dogs but honestly I would not recommend them for a family farm. They seem better suited as range dogs. Take them out with the flock and leave them there. Once they bond with the animals they will protect them ferociously.
I would maybe look at a Pyrenees or maybe even a good farm collie. There is a family I know of who got an old Mitty farm collie and is best with the goats and sheep and sticks around.

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
Go to Top of Page
  Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To: