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 SEMEN FOR SALE: Heritage Jersey A2A2/polled
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maryjane

6141 Posts


Posted - Oct 31 2014 :  5:07:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Semen from MJF Tumbleweed Samson Butters (born 4/11/2011, A2A2, heterozygous polled) is finally ready for your AI endeavors. For all of you who have waited and asked repeatedly, I thank you for your patience. You’ll find ordering/pricing information at the bottom of this post.



One of the reasons it took so long to harvest this magnificent bull is because I wanted to offer his semen as CSS certified, which means he was tested for seven different diseases prior to transportation, tested again once he arrived at the Genex facility, held in containment for 30 days, tested again, harvested, and then tested again before transportation back to our farm in Idaho.



On his way to and from Genex (a 1,200 mile round trip traveled twice), Samson had enough room that he could turn around and lay down in his trailer but not enough room that he wasn’t quickly contained by padded walls should we stop suddenly. At all times his health was monitored from our dashboard via a camera above his head.



Genex facility and collection procedures:



Why is CSS certified so important to me? Why buy semen from a bull that has undergone such rigorous testing? CSS certified is an inspection service engaged in the processing of livestock semen. Strict standards and rules assure the authenticity of the semen. Protocols are in place to protect the end user regarding the handling, labeling, and identification of the semen. Sanitary conditions and requirements for the addition of appropriate additives and extenders added to the semen control specific undesirable microorganisms. The CSS requirements represent a standard for those diseases proven to be a significant threat seminally transmitted by AI. It also dictates standards for general welfare, watering, veterinary, professional care, and seminal collection. It provides uniform standards for monitoring AI industry management practices and provides evidence that the facility is concerned with animal welfare. It also meant Samson wasn’t going to bring diseases picked up during harvesting home to my herd. Often a bull is harvested only once, creating a discard mentality.

Once Samson was back home, and within a week after his arrival, he successfully impregnated through live mount for the second time my miniature Jersey, Etta Jane (born 1/25/2012, height 39.5 inches at the withers, A1A1, H/H). Birth photos of her previous Samson calf (a heifer, Lacy Lou, A1A2, Pf/H) can be found here. A current photo of Lacy Lou can be found here. Samson’s other calf born at our farm (Sir Anthony) to a mid-size cow can be found here. The number of calves sired by Samson before he came to live with us in Idaho on 8/29/2013 is nine. All of his offspring are healthy and were born without difficulty. Even though there is a genetic test for the most common form of chondrodysplasia (dwarfism), a condition that shows up in miniature Jerseys, his mid-size stature is insurance against this defect. Samson is 49 inches tall at the withers and weighs 1,043 pounds. (See measurement standards here.) He is polled (heterozygous), Pf/H. I also think it’s wise—and the technician at Genex confirmed this—to harvest semen from bulls that are close to or beyond three years of age so there is a birth history on them and genetic problems will have had a chance to show up.



Further genetic testing on Samson also confirmed that his Kappa Casein is A/A (the A genotype is associated with higher milk production) and his Beta Lactoglobulin is B/B (the B variant is associated with increased casein and fat content and is favorable for cheese production).

This is a photo of Samson as a young calf next to his mother.



This is a photo of his mother's udder. (Sorry, she's no longer alive and this is the only photo that was taken by her owner who said she was a fantastic producer--several gallons/day--and never once had mastitis and that she was easy to milk by hand or machine.)



This is a photo of his father.



When I picked Samson up, the manager of the Genex facility remarked, “Every now and then we get what we call a ‘dreamboat bull.’ Samson was an absolute pleasure to work with. He was always accommodating and never aggressive—great disposition. Because of his exceptional fertility, we could have put aside 5,000 straws on this guy.” In an earlier email from her she said, “I want to let you know that we began collections on Samson. He did great the first day. He had a high libido, and served the AV well. Additionally, his semen quality looked excellent, and I was able to freeze 164 units. That has been evaluated for a post thaw motility, and also passes.”

It should be noted that when I first approached Genex about the possibility of bringing Samson to them for collection, they told me they don’t take dairy bulls because they can be so difficult to collect. In the end, we were both glad I talked them into it.

Samson’s semen is $85/straw. Heritage Jersey Organization members receive a 20% discount ($68/straw). Heritage Jersey Organization members with one HJO registered animal receive a 40% discount ($51/straw). Heritage Jersey Organization members with two or more HJO registered animals receive a 60% discount ($34/straw).



Click here to purchase MJF Tumbleweed Samson Butters A2A2 polled semen. Once we’ve received your payment, I will contact you regarding shipping details. At that time, any discounts you have coming to you will be applied toward the approximately $100-$130 charge for shipping the semen (container rental, carrier charges to your location, and return shipping on the container). If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to call me at 208-882-0307.



MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~

CloversMum

3280 Posts


Posted - Oct 31 2014 :  8:59:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Love this, MaryJane! I think Samson is even more handsome in person...

Loving life, hubby, and children on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; 2 Jersey cows; 1 Guernsey cow; Oberhasli & Guernsey goats, ducks and chickens
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Jersey James

176 Posts
James
Central FL
United States

Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  06:24:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks maryjane for posting such complete information! The first thing my wife said yesterday, when she looked over my shoulder at pictures of Samson was, "he's beau-ti-ful!" Lacy Lou is beautiful as well.

I actually paid $50 (total) to UC Davis to do a2 tests for both of our girls and have collected the tail hair. I'll be sending that out on Monday. I have not read "The Devil is in The Milk" yet. I'm wondering if the book, or anyone here, can help elucidate the matter of whether an a1/a2 cow's milk would be a1, a2, or something inbetween?

maryjane, I appreciate the discounts, you have allowed on semen, for owners of cows in your registry. I've been marveling at your many talents. You have so many unique and creative irons in the fire. You must have a blast being you! I can't find the cost for listing a Jersey in the registry. Again, please forgive me if it's obvious. I even started the process of registering thinking that it would pop up somewhere. Perhaps I just overlooked it. Thanks Again! James
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  06:41:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good morning James. Hope things are going well for you and yours this morning. Sounds like you have a good thing going yourself there!
I belive the fee schedule you are looking for is in the cattle register tab at the top. Click on that link and when it opens I belive there is a fee schedule link there.

Again a little about you guys and some cow pictures would be great. Always love to get to know fellow/fellowette cow lovers.

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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maryjane

6141 Posts


Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  07:12:16 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good morning James! It's good to hear from you and yes, I agree with your wife regarding Samson.

For sure, life has blessings and for some reason, I've been gifted more than my fair share. Based on the idea, for whom much is given, much is required, I’m committed to the idea of, How may I help you? Living at the end of a dirt road, founding this registry, starting this chatroom, spending time with my cows/family/farmhands every day IS a blast!

Here is information on our registry:
https://www.heritagejersey.org/registry.aspx
If that doesn’t answer your questions, shoot me an email.

Here is a thread on A2 from a few months ago. I'm still digging around about it in an ongoing way. I keep thinking, It's had such force in the marketplace, doesn't that tell us something? I'm constantly talking and reading up on it and change my mind about it constantly. https://heritagejersey.org/chatroom/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=118

A2 Australia has back pedaled on their health claims, not that that necessarily means anything one way or the other. What their website says now is “a2 Milk TM is pure dairy milk, completely natural and additive free, which is why it tastes so refreshing. Most dairy milk today contains 2 main types of beta casein protein, A2 and A1, while originally all dairy cows produced milk containing only the A2 type of beta-casein protein, a2 Milk TM comes from cows specially selected to produce A2 beta-casein protein rather than A1. Because a2 Milk TM is rich in A2 beta-casein, it may assist in your digestive wellbeing.”

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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NellieBelle

10376 Posts


Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  07:15:32 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Congrats with your registering with Heritage Jersey, Jersey James. I've always wanted to register Nellie but it's too confusing. I don't know if she is acceptable or not and about the time I think I have the form filled out right then I see I've messed up. And then it's time to go to work, so never get it done. I'm sure it's an age and time thing for me.
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maryjane

6141 Posts


Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  07:35:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I can relate. I hate forms and that type of computer work also. Yes, yes, YES! you should register your Jerseys. How about you send me your info in an email and we'll have Gabe enter it into the format he designed. Confession: I still don't know how to load pics on here and you've figured that out Janet!

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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NellieBelle

10376 Posts


Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  07:55:34 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Would sending a photo of Certificate of Registration be enough MaryJane?

To laugh is human but to moo is bovine. Author Unknown
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maryjane

6141 Posts


Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  07:57:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, that's a great place to start. Jasper says good morning.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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Jersey James

176 Posts
James
Central FL
United States

Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  07:58:04 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Ron! Good morning to you too.

A bit about us. We are a Happy, Healthy, Homeschooling, Homesteading, family who recently transplanted from Hawaii, but we are not Hippies (I think). I lived in Hawaii for 14 years and met Ines there 8 years ago. She was a German girl on vacation and she took me home for a souvenir. The net thing I knew I was married and had a son. I am blessed.
Ines is in charge of milking our 7 year old Jersey cow Lucy. Lucy belonged to a nutritionist and was fed better than most humans. We originally were interested in Lucy's heifer, Noel, but we just were not ready at our new mini farm to host her. Someone else purchased Noel so we bought Lucy who was due to calve in Spring. Lucy calved a bull calf on April Fool's Day. His name is Rind and he is now a steer. Ines was not prepared to live with a Jersey bull. Very recently we were informed that Noel's owners had had a human baby and needed to scale back. We were able to add Noel to our family. The mom, brother, and sister are a very content little herd together and they have two pastures of about 4 acres each, with lush Florida grass to enjoy.

Ines Makes butter, mozzarella, feta, and other goodies. I built a press and have the makings of a cheese cave but we have yet to do hard cheeses. We have cheese books in two languages and Mary Jane's book is on the way so it should happen soon.

Our son, Tristan Makanalani "Maka" Hall, (7), is the official chicken feeder and "out of the garden!", reprimander and has 18 souls in his flock.

We grow organic gardens and use organic feeds on our farm.

We have studied permaculture and do our best to apply permaculture principles in our farm and our life.

We always wanted a small family homestead. We've been here just over a year now and it's amazing what happens on a farm in a year's time. We started with overgrown neglect, no gardens, and no animals. Now it feels like a real family farm. We have a nursery of fruit trees that need to go in the ground and there is always more to be done. We continue to refine what we are already doing to make more time for new things. All watering is now automatic for gardens and animals. Did I mention our rabbit colony?

We have even trained a neighbor girl to do everything for a few days and were actually able to explore Florida for a few days recently. That's huge! We recently converted to once a day milking and I am convinced that this is the only way to go for both cow and human. I'm a big believer in the mid size cow. Lucy is a sweetheart and fortunately was 6 when we first met. As our first cow, her sweet demeanor, and the fact that she was dry, gave us 4 months to brush, play, narrowly escape being mounted, lol, and tune in to cowness before milking and caring for a calf came in to play. It could have not worked out better. Lucy peaked at 4 gallons and a smidge per day (TAD) and is now settling in at 1.75 to 2ish on OAD milking.

So that's us! We have a steer born April Fools Day and a Heifer born Christmas Eve. Both have the same sire. Draw your own conclusions! Thanks again for the quick help and warm welcomes. Nice to know you all. I'd love to hear more about everyone and will get more photo's up soon.

PS: Here is Beauregard. He is not ours but he sired Noel and Rind.


How many cows is enough?
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NellieBelle

10376 Posts


Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  07:59:32 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
And I reply with, a "tidily widily" to his belly!"
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NellieBelle

10376 Posts


Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  08:00:25 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Oh and I will send you the Certificate of Registration (photo) for Nellie. Do I send it to you MaryJane or HJO manager?

Edited by - NellieBelle on Nov 01 2014 08:03:57 AM
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  08:08:56 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great to meet you guys James! You sound like another awesome family. Warms my heart to know folks like you are out there. Glad and proud to have you in our community. Be looking forward to getting to know and interacting with you over the years to come. Seems like we learn do much from each other here and have some downright good talks.

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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Jersey James

176 Posts
James
Central FL
United States

Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  08:45:01 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you Ron. I'd love to hear more and see more of your farmily.

Here are a few recent shots of the gang. I'm no photographer and these are done on a new (unfamiliar) phone so they are what they are but you get the idea!


How many cows is enough?
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maryjane

6141 Posts


Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  08:51:00 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Send to me Nellie. Together we'll hold hands and cuff the ears off our computers.

James, loved your story. Very inspiring and heartwarming. When you and Ines start making hard cheese, my DIL, Ashley, and I are here to help you with any questions you may have.

Ashley made Quesa Fresca this week (a soft cheese). We'll finalize the recipe and share it here. It's like a cross between a moist havarti and feta. We devoured it, like pieces of pie.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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maryjane

6141 Posts


Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  08:53:04 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Gorgeous cows. GORGEOUS, pastoral setting. Love the face of a Jersey cow. Lucky you!

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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NellieBelle

10376 Posts


Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  08:56:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Beautiful, beautiful animals Jersey James. And your photos are awesome. Love the photo of the girls and the chickens. Thank you for sharing them. You have a nice little group there.
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NellieBelle

10376 Posts


Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  09:06:29 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you so much MaryJane.
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Jersey James

176 Posts
James
Central FL
United States

Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  09:55:47 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote


Thank you NellieBelle and Mary Jane for the nice words and offer of support. Lucy is a fantastic Mom. We used a nose ring to wean Rind at about 10-12 weeks of age so they have been able to stay together - going on month 8 now. It came out a couple of months ago but by then he was done nursing. At first we shared the milk and it worked fine but soon he was taking everything! For a while there he was swiping over 3 gallons a day all for himself! The nose ring is a fantastic option.

How many cows is enough?
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  10:02:14 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Goodness James, what a great heard of cows, nice flock of chickens and beautiful plush surroundings! I think you and your family is going to like this little online community.
I have learned so much and enjoy the company of fellow lactating bovine enthusisats on a daily basis. We have quilters and Milkers, goats chickens and cows, people with pigs and everything in between from places I have never heard of !

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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NellieBelle

10376 Posts


Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  10:17:07 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Love your story/history Jersey James. So happy you joined the HJO family. You won't find better folks. Will love chatting with you and I know you will gain lots here on this chatroom. I certainly did and still learning. Everyone is warm and welcoming and just extremely helpful. An amazing group. I put a Quiet Wean in my Pumpkin Moonshine's nose and he still drinks all the milk. It must be something in our water. LOL.

To laugh is human but to moo is bovine. Author Unknown
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Jersey James

176 Posts
James
Central FL
United States

Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  10:33:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks NellieBellie, I checked out the quiet wean. It's very similar to the one that ended up working for us. I ordered two kinds. Rind figured the first one out. It was a green, large spiked affair and it worked for a couple of weeks and then he learned to drink with it. Then I switched to the flat kind like yours and he soon gave up. It was a bit more spiked than the quiet wean appears to be. Both kinds of rings were very inexpensive at valleyvet.

How many cows is enough?
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NellieBelle

10376 Posts


Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  10:37:21 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Okay, well I either need to get a different kind of nose ring or just let him have momma. I would really miss her cream. I tried separating them yesterday and all I got done was running calves back into the pastures they were suppose to be in. I got a real work out yesterday. Didn't cost a dime. :)
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CloversMum

3280 Posts


Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  5:11:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Welcome James! Our youngest son is 8 yo so just a tad bit older than yours...what a fun age! And so perfect to have a farm to raise children. And, your cows are beautiful...the green pastures are beautiful too as its not something that is available this time of year in northern Idaho! If you go to the "welcome wagon" page, you can read up on all of us and our backgrounds which may or may not explain our love of Jerseys.


Loving life, hubby, and children on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; 2 Jersey cows; 1 Guernsey cow; Oberhasli & Guernsey goats, ducks and chickens
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  5:29:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
And some of us black sheep who don't have Jerseys..lol..hi Charlene! Hope you had a good day.

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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Jersey James

176 Posts
James
Central FL
United States

Posted - Nov 01 2014 :  5:34:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks CLoversMum. It is a great age. Feel free to come down and enjoy our grass! We are actually supposed to be 39 degrees in the AM. Maka and I went out and gathered 3 wheelbarrows of wood for the fire tomorrow morning! Stay warm!

How many cows is enough?
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