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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Feb 12 2016 :  10:31:43 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
As we are making our plans for our cow/goat dairy barn, we were advised to create concrete "curbs" where we want the walls to be. Unfortunately, that may not happen due to it not being covered by the grant that I received. However, the NRCS advised some sort of waterproof wall material in the milking parlor areas.

Do any of you know of that sort of thing? Product names? We may still create a "curb" for the base of the wall to cut down on water damage as we spray out the milking parlor as necessary. What sort of wall/board material could we use either on top of or in place of wood walls?

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens

txbikergirl

3197 Posts


Posted - Feb 12 2016 :  11:50:25 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
charlene, will they at least let the grant cover a raised "footer". This is common construction for many walls, and then my thought goes to pushing the limits of what they allow for the footer - as perhaps you can get a few more inches than normal. a footer in a wet environment would be the minimum recommended construction , although your curb was much better.

i don't know any other info. i'm just good about getting around government regulations and such, and sometimes with a change in terminology i can at least find something that flies and is a good compromise instead of just being told no.

then i start wondering, if you c an get a footer out of them is it possible to build some walls out of concrete block a foot or two up? would work as well as the curb, but now it is just a change in material on the wall ... just start rethinking it and see if there is some outside the box thinking that might work.

Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Feb 12 2016 :  2:44:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Concrete blocks just might be the ticket! I'm wondering if we could add those later when we actually put in the parlor walls. Right now, we are hoping to get the roof, concrete floor and exterior walls done for sure this year. Pallet fences work great for the goats (and are free!) and cattle panels can work for the cows.

Unfortunately, the grant pays a flat fee and they won't add on curbs or stub walls or any other code word. And it is fine ... I'm so thankful for this grant anyway! It is simply amazing! We just have to be careful how and what we actually spend ourselves.

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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txbikergirl

3197 Posts


Posted - Feb 12 2016 :  6:49:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
so perhaps i misunderstood. you mentioned the curbs "not being covered by the grant", but are you really saying that the amount of the grant can't stretch to cover the cost of curbs? so it is just a budgetary issue, not that the grant prohibits certain items? just trying to make sure i understand.

if it is budgetary i would still see if you could work a short footer in now with the concrete installation, then inexpensive walls down to that. then later i would come back and build concrete block walls on top of the footer

Firefly Hollow Farm , our little farmstead. Farmgirl living in the green piney woods of East Texas on 23 acres with a few jerseys, too many chickens, a pair of pugs and my Texan hubby (aka "lover boy")
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Feb 13 2016 :  05:35:29 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes it is part budgetary constraints and a difference of opinions amongst the NRCS people themselves. Bottom line is they won't cover interior walls or increased costs of stubbed walls or "curbs". There is a flat fee for concrete work. We will work with a builder to see if we can go ahead with curbs as they pour the floor and add walls later as we can afford it.


Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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maryjane

7001 Posts


Posted - Feb 13 2016 :  07:07:17 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Do you have a builder lined up, yet? Start date?

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Feb 18 2016 :  08:41:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
No builder yet, Maryjane. More phone calls are being made today. I get so frustrated when builders won't call you back or follow through. The grant and plans are all ready ... just need a competent responsible builder who is willing.

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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maryjane

7001 Posts


Posted - Feb 18 2016 :  08:48:39 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It's an unpaid time thing I think. If you offer to pay them to work up a bid for you, they won't end up charging you but you'll go to the top of their "serious about building" list. I think too many people like to window shop and it uses up a lot of their time.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Feb 18 2016 :  08:58:05 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
One person we were ready to hire and go ahead, but then they won't call back. We've offered to pay for bids as well. My hubby does "free" bids a lot and knows the amount of work involved so is very careful about not wasting others' time.

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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maryjane

7001 Posts


Posted - Feb 18 2016 :  09:08:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That is frustrating. Often time, a contractor's office skills leave something to be desired.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Feb 18 2016 :  7:45:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Finally heard back from a couple and will talk to a third next week, then a decision will be made. It looks like we'll need to more and more of the work ourselves which could be a great learning experience for all. My youngest is thrilled with the prospect! He wants to drive the excavator!

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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